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Sustainable Construction for Urban Infill Development Using Engineered Massive Wood Panel Systems

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  • Steffen Lehmann

    ()
    (The University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia)

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    Abstract

    Prefabricated engineered solid wood panel construction systems can sequester and store CO 2. Modular cross-laminated timber (CLT, also called cross-lam) panels form the basis of low-carbon, engineered construction systems using solid wood panels that can be used to build residential infill developments of 10 storeys or higher. Multi-apartment buildings of 4 to 10 storeys constructed entirely in timber, such as recently in Europe, are innovative, but their social and cultural acceptance in Australia and North America is at this stage still uncertain. Future commercial utilisation is only possible if there is a user acceptance. The author is part of a research team that aims to study two problems: first models of urban infill; then focus on how the use of the CLT systems can play an important role in facilitating a more livable city with better models of infill housing. Wood is an important contemporary building resource due to its low embodied energy and unique attributes. The potential of prefabricated engineered solid wood panel systems, such as CLT, as a sustainable building material and system is only just being realised around the globe. Since timber is one of the few materials that has the capacity to store carbon in large quantities over a long period of time, solid wood panel construction offers the opportunity of carbon engineering, to turn buildings into ‘carbon sinks’. Thus some of the historically negative environmental impact of urban development and construction can be turned around with CLT construction on brownfield sites.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 10 (October)
    Pages: 2707-2742

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    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:10:p:2707-2742:d:20780

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    Related research

    Keywords: engineered timber; prefabrication; solid wood panel construction system; social acceptance; sustainable design;

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    1. Guerra, Erick & Cervero, Robert, 2012. "Transit and the "D" Word," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt83f6q2nv, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Yuan, Xueliang & Zuo, Jian & Ma, Chunyuan, 2011. "Social acceptance of solar energy technologies in China--End users' perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1031-1036, March.
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