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Global household leverage, house prices, and consumption

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  • Reuven Glick
  • Kevin J. Lansing

Abstract

Household leverage in the United States and many industrial countries increased dramatically in the decade prior to 2007. Countries with the largest increases in household leverage tended to experience the fastest rises in house prices over the same period. These same countries tended to experience the biggest declines in household consumption once house prices started falling.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its journal FRBSF Economic Letter.

Volume (Year): (2010)
Issue (Month): jan11 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2010:i:jan11:n:2010-01

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Related research

Keywords: Households - Economic aspects ; Financial leverage ; Housing - Prices ; Consumer behavior ; Consumption (Economics);

References

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  1. Reuven Glick & Kevin J. Lansing, 2009. "U.S. household deleveraging and future consumption growth," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue may15.
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Cited by:
  1. Amir Sufi, 2012. "Detecting "Bad" Leverage," NBER Chapters, in: Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling, pages 205-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jeffrey Thompson & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2010. "Recent Trends in the Distribution of Income: Labor, Wealth and More Complete Measures of Well Being," Working Papers wp225, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  3. Bardhan, Ashok & Walker, Richard A., 2010. "California, Pivot of the Great Recession," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt0qn3z3td, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  4. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2011. "Consumers and the economy, part II: Household debt and the weak U.S. recovery," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue jan18.
  5. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2011. "House Prices, Home Equity-Based Borrowing, and the US Household Leverage Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2132-56, August.
  6. Javier Andrés & José Boscá & Francisco Ferri, 2012. "Household leverage and fiscal multipliers," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 1215, Banco de Espa�a.

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