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Imprisonment and the Crime Rate in Ireland

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  • Eoin O’Sullivan

    (Trinity College Dublin)

  • Ian O’Donnell

    (University College Dublin)

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    Abstract

    Between 1995 and 1999, the number of indictable crimes recorded in Ireland dropped by 21 per cent and the daily average prison population rose by 33 per cent. The Government has claimed that a causal relationship exists here: more prisoners means less crime. The purpose of this paper is to map recent trends in the use of prison and to explore the interaction between rates of crime and rates of imprisonment.

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    File URL: http://www.esr.ie/Vol34_3OSullivan.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2003
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Economic and Social Studies in its journal Economic and Social Review.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 33–64

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    Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:34:y:2003:i:1:p:33-64

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    Web page: http://www.esr.ie

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    1. S. Illeris & G. Akehurst, 2002. "Introduction," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 1-3, January.
    2. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters, in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Steven D. Levitt, 1995. "The Effect of Prison Population Size on Crime Rates: Evidence From Prison Overcrowding Litigation," NBER Working Papers 5119, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. A. W. Coats, 1996. "Introduction," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 28(5), pages 3-11, Supplemen.
    5. Hope Corman & Naci Mocan, 2002. "Carrots, Sticks and Broken Windows," NBER Working Papers 9061, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Levitt, Steven D, 1998. "Why Do Increased Arrest Rates Appear to Reduce Crime: Deterrence, Incapacitation, or Measurement Error?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(3), pages 353-72, July.
    7. Bar-Gill, O. & Harel, A., 2000. "Crime Rates and Expected Sanctions: The Economics of Deterrence Revisited," Papers 2000-14, Tel Aviv.
    8. Isaac Ehrlich, 1996. "Crime, Punishment, and the Market for Offenses," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 43-67, Winter.
    9. Kevin Denny & Colm Harmon & Reamonn Lydon, 2004. "An Econometric Analysis of Burglary in Ireland," Working Papers 200416, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
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