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Positive feedback trading, institutional investors and securities price fluctuation

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  • Yin Hong
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    Abstract

    Purpose–The purpose of this paper is to research and analyze the influence of institutional investors in the present securities market due to behavior alienation with “running after rising and falling” and “herd behavior”. Design/methodology/approach–A DeLong, Shleifer, Summers, and Waldmann (DSSW) model with positive feedback trading is established first to show the trading process, and these securities prices are calculated considering the investors' emotion. Through numerical analysis, the influence of institutional investors on securities price fluctuation is simulated. Further, the analysis of institutional investors' incomes is processed based on this model. Findings–Through these analyses, the following conclusions are drawn: it lies on the scale of positive feedback traders and their sensitivity to past market performances whether the institutional investors can stabilize the market, and it is not necessary for the institutional investors to benefit from manipulating the market due to the existence of noise trader risk, so the positive feedback traders may survive in the security market over the long term. Originality/value–The DSSW model considering positive feedback trading, presented in the paper, is more effective in analyzing the relation among the behavior of institutional investors, securities pricing and securities price fluctuation. The paper proposes some advice for policy decisions, which is helpful for government and institutions to maintain the stability of securities markets.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal China Finance Review International.

    Volume (Year): 1 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 120-132

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    Handle: RePEc:eme:cfripp:v:1:y:2011:i:2:p:120-132

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    Web page: http://www.emeraldinsight.com

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    Postal: Emerald Group Publishing, Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley, BD16 1WA, UK
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    Related research

    Keywords: China; Investors; Securities; Stock prices; Stockholder analysis;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Hirshleifer, David & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar & Titman, Sheridan, 2004. "Feedback and the Success of Irrational Investors," Working Paper Series 2004-8, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    2. J. Bradford De Long & Andrei Shleifer & Lawrence H. Summers & Robert J. Waldmann, 1989. "Positive Feedback Investment Strategies and Destabilizing Rational Speculation," NBER Working Papers 2880, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lakonishok, Josef & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1992. "The impact of institutional trading on stock prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 23-43, August.
    4. Francis X. Diebold & Kamil Yilmaz, 2008. "Macroeconomic Volatility and Stock Market Volatility, World-Wide," PIER Working Paper Archive 08-031, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    5. Shleifer, Andrei, 2000. "Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292272.
    6. Kim Sosin & Janet Rives & Janet West, 1998. "Unions and Gender Pay Equity in Academe: A Study of U.S. Institutions," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 25-45.
    7. Richard W. Sias, 2007. "Reconcilable Differences: Momentum Trading by Institutions," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 42(1), pages 1-22, 02.
    8. S.G. Badrinath & Sunil Wahal, 2002. "Momentum Trading by Institutions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(6), pages 2449-2478, December.
    9. James A. Bennett, 2003. "Greener Pastures and the Impact of Dynamic Institutional Preferences," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 16(4), pages 1203-1238.
    10. Rubin, Amir & Smith, Daniel R., 2009. "Institutional ownership, volatility and dividends," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 627-639, April.
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