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Built environment effects on leisure travel for children: Trip generation and travel mode

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  • Lin, Jen-Jia
  • Yu, Tzu-Pen
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    Abstract

    This study empirically analyzed the effects of built environment on leisure travel among children. Students of three elementary schools, namely Yangmingshan, Sanyu and Shilin, all located in the Shilin District of Taipei, were chosen to provide sample data. The negative binomial regression model and multinomial logit model were used to analyze trip generation and travel mode, respectively. This study reached the following empirical findings: (1) mixed land use, employment density, walkway quality, leisure facility supply and leisure travel distance encouraged generation of leisure trips for children; (2) intersection density, building density, employment density and walkway quality encouraged a child to use transit systems or non-motorized travel modes for leisure travel; and (3) vehicle density and leisure travel distance discouraged walking and biking but encouraged the use of transit systems for leisure travel involving children. Local government can use the empirical findings of this study to develop urban planning strategies to encourage children to perform leisure activities outside the home using transit systems or non-motorized travel modes.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

    Volume (Year): 18 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 246-258

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:1:p:246-258

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    Related research

    Keywords: Built environment Child Leisure travel Negative binomial regression model Multinomial logit model;

    References

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    1. Rachel Copperman & Chandra Bhat, 2007. "An analysis of the determinants of children’s weekend physical activity participation," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 67-87, January.
    2. Jen-Jia Lin & Hsiao-Te Chang, 2010. "Built Environment Effects on Children’s School Travel in Taipai: Independence and Travel Mode," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(4), pages 867-889, April.
    3. Noreen McDonald, 2008. "Children’s mode choice for the school trip: the role of distance and school location in walking to school," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 23-35, January.
    4. Gudmundur F Ulfarsson & Venkataraman N Shankar, 2008. "Children’s travel to school: discrete choice modeling of correlated motorized and nonmotorized transportation modes using covariance heterogeneity," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(2), pages 195-206, March.
    5. McMillan, Tracy E., 2007. "The relative influence of urban form on a child's travel mode to school," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 69-79, January.
    6. Ipek Sener & Chandra Bhat, 2007. "An analysis of the social context of children’s weekend discretionary activity participation," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(6), pages 697-721, November.
    7. Ipek Sener & Rachel Copperman & Ram Pendyala & Chandra Bhat, 2008. "An analysis of children’s leisure activity engagement: examining the day of week, location, physical activity level, and fixity dimensions," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 673-696, August.
    8. Amith Yarlagadda & Sivaramakrishnan Srinivasan, 2008. "Modeling children’s school travel mode and parental escort decisions," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 201-218, March.
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    Cited by:
    1. Buckley, Aaron & Lowry, Michael B. & Brown, Helen & Barton, Benjamin, 2013. "Evaluating safe routes to school events that designate days for walking and bicycling," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 294-300.

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