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Benefits and costs to China of three different climate treaties

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  • Vennemo, Haakon
  • Aunan, Kristin
  • Jianwu, He
  • Tao, Hu
  • Shantong, Li
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    Abstract

    There are currently several ideas on the table for a climate treaty post-Kyoto. We consider the impact on China of three ideas: a cap on the CO2 intensity, a cap on the CO2 level, and a cap on the CO2 intensity in key sectors. We find that a cap on the CO2 intensity gives large environmental co-benefits to China on aggregate, but there are significant negative effects for rural households. Assuming these are addressed the country could reduce its CO2 intensity by a third before costs outweigh environmental co-benefits. By contrast a cap confined to the manufacturing and power sector does not bring substantial co-benefits to China.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Resource and Energy Economics.

    Volume (Year): 31 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages: 139-160

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:139-160

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505569

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    Keywords: Climate Commitment Treaty China;

    References

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    1. Solveig Glomsrød & Wei Taoyuan, 2003. "Coal cleaning: A viable strategy for reduced carbon emissions and improved environment in China?," Discussion Papers 356, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
    2. Garbaccio, Richard F. & Ho, Mun S. & Jorgenson, Dale W., 1999. "Controlling carbon emissions in China," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(04), pages 493-518, October.
    3. Nazrul Islam & Erbiao Dai & Hiroshi Sakamoto, 2006. "Role of TFP in China's Growth ," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 127-159, 06.
    4. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve Is Downward Sloping: Reexamining The Impact Of Immigration On The Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374, November.
    5. Wang, Yan & Xu, Dianqing & Wang, Zhi & Zhai, Fan, 2004. "Options and impact of China's pension reform: a computable general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 105-127, March.
    6. Alwyn Young, 2003. "Gold into Base Metals: Productivity Growth in the People's Republic of China during the Reform Period," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(6), pages 1220-1261, December.
    7. Pizer, William, 2005. "The Case for Intensity Targets," Discussion Papers dp-05-02, Resources For the Future.
    8. Aunan, Kristin & Berntsen, Terje & O'Connor, David & Persson, Therese Hindman & Vennemo, Haakon & Zhai, Fan, 2007. "Benefits and costs to China of a climate policy," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(03), pages 471-497, June.
    9. Randall Lutter, 2000. "Developing Countries' Greenhouse Emmissions: Uncertainty and Implications for Participation in the Kyoto Protocol," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 93-120.
    10. Aunan, Kristin & Fang, Jinghua & Vennemo, Haakon & Oye, Kenneth & Seip, Hans M., 2004. "Co-benefits of climate policy--lessons learned from a study in Shanxi, China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 567-581, March.
    11. David O’Connor & Fan Zhai & Kristin Aunan & Terje Berntsen & Haakon Vennemo, 2003. "Agricultural and Human Health Impacts of Climate Policy in China: A General Equilibrium Analysis with Special Reference to Guangdong," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 206, OECD Publishing.
    12. Fisher-Vanden, Karen & Jefferson, Gary H. & Liu, Hongmei & Tao, Quan, 2004. "What is driving China's decline in energy intensity?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 77-97, March.
    13. Vennemo, Haakon & Aunan, Kristin & He, Jianwu & Hu, Tao & Li, Shantong & Rypd3al, Kristin, 2008. "Environmental impacts of China's WTO-accession," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(4), pages 893-911, February.
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    Cited by:
    1. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2013. "Regional Effects in China of an Emissions-Reduction Policy: Tax v. Subsidy," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1275, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Lucas Bretschger & Lin Zhang, 2014. "Going beyond tradition: Carbon policy in a high-growth economy: The case of China," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 14/201, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    3. Zhao, Xiaoli & Yin, Haitao, 2011. "Industrial relocation and energy consumption: Evidence from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2944-2956, May.
    4. Niu, Shuwen & Ding, Yongxia & Niu, Yunzhu & Li, Yixin & Luo, Guanghua, 2011. "Economic growth, energy conservation and emissions reduction: A comparative analysis based on panel data for 8 Asian-Pacific countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 2121-2131, April.
    5. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2012. "The Regional Economic Effects of a Reduction in Carbon Emissions and An Evaluation of Offsetting Policies in China," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 12-14, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    6. Wei Xie & Ning Li & Chunhua Li & Ji-dong Wu & Aijun Hu & Xiaolin Hao, 2014. "Quantifying cascading effects triggered by disrupted transportation due to the Great 2008 Chinese Ice Storm: implications for disaster risk management," Natural Hazards, International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 70(1), pages 337-352, January.

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