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Does losing your home mean losing your school?: Effects of foreclosures on the school mobility of children

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Author Info

  • Been, Vicki
  • Ellen, Ingrid Gould
  • Schwartz, Amy Ellen
  • Stiefel, Leanna
  • Weinstein, Meryle

Abstract

In the last few years, millions of homes around the country have entered foreclosure, pushing many families out of their homes and potentially forcing their children to move to new schools. Unfortunately, despite considerable attention to the causes and consequences of mortgage defaults, we understand little about the distribution and severity of these impacts on school children. This paper takes a step toward filling that gap through studying how foreclosures in New York City affect the mobility of public school children across schools. A significant body of research suggests that, in general, switching schools is costly for students, though the magnitude of the effect depends critically on the nature of the move and the quality of the origin and destination schools.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 41 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 407-414

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Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:41:y:2011:i:4:p:407-414

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Keywords: Foreclosure Mobility Schools Public education Housing instability;

References

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  1. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2001. "Disruption versus Tiebout Improvement: The Costs and Benefits of Switching Schools," NBER Working Papers 8479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mehana, Majida & Reynolds, Arthur J., 2004. "School mobility and achievement: a meta-analysis," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 93-119, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui & Chisako Yamane & Shoko Yamane, 2014. "Inherited social capital and residential mobility: A study using Japan panel data," ISER Discussion Paper 0906, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.

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