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Changes in commuting to work times over the 1990 to 2000 period

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Author Info

  • Kirby, Dustin K.
  • LeSage, James P.

Abstract

Travel times to work from the 2000 Census show an increase in average commuting times that is difficult to reconcile with the viewpoint expressed in earlier literature that suburbanization has provided a solution by acting as a traffic "safety valve", preventing a "traffic doomsday" from occurring in the face of urban growth. We examine commuting times to work using US tract-level Census data for the years 1990 and 2000. A spatial econometric modeling approach that allows us to distinguish between commuting time congestion spillover impacts arising from shared roadways is developed. We compare the influence of 1990 and 2000 tract-level characteristics of residents that give rise to long commute times (over 45Â min).

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 460-471

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Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:39:y:2009:i:4:p:460-471

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/regec

Related research

Keywords: Spatial spillovers Congestion Spatial Durbin model;

References

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  1. Arnott, Richard & de Palma, Andre & Lindsey, Robin, 1990. "Economics of a bottleneck," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 111-130, January.
  2. Gordon, Peter & Kumar, Ajay & Richardson, Harry W., 1989. "The influence of metropolitan spatial structure on commuting time," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 138-151, September.
  3. Crane, Randall, 2007. "Is There a Quiet Revolution in Women's Travel? Revisiting the Gender Gap in Commuting," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt8nj9n8nb, University of California Transportation Center.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Parent, Olivier & LeSage, James P., 2010. "A spatial dynamic panel model with random effects applied to commuting times," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 633-645, June.
  2. Paul Elhorst & Solmaria Halleck Vega, 2013. "On spatial econometric models, spillover effects, and W," ERSA conference papers ersa13p222, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Angelo Antoci & Simone Borghesi & Gerardo Marletto, 2012. "To drive or not to drive? A simple evolutionary model," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2012(2), pages 31-47.
  4. James LeSage & Matthew Dominguez, 2012. "The importance of modeling spatial spillovers in public choice analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 525-545, March.
  5. Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira & Tim Schwanen, 2013. "Commute Time in Brazil (1992-2009): Differences Between Metropolitan Areas, by Income Levels and Gender," Discussion Papers 1813a, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
  6. Arnstein Gjestland & David McArthur & Liv Osland & Inge Thorsen, 2011. "Relationships between housing prices and commuting flows," ERSA conference papers ersa10p906, European Regional Science Association.

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