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Crime and the Timing of Work

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  • Hamermesh, Daniel S.

Abstract

Two striking facts describe work timing in the United States: a lower propensity to work evenings and nights in large metropolitan areas, and a secular decline in such work since 1973. One explanation is higher and possibly increasing crime in large areas. I link Current Population Survey data on work timing to FBI crime reports. Neither fact is explained by changes in nor inter-area differences in crime rates, but higher homicide rates do reduce such work. This reduction implicitly costs the economy between $4 and $10 billion. This negative externality illustrates a larger class of previously unmeasured costs of social pathologies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 45 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 311-330

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Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:45:y:1999:i:2:p:311-330

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622905

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References

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  1. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & Jose A. Scheinkman, 1995. "Crime and Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 5026, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Edward J. Schumacher & Barry T. Hirsch, . "Compensating Differentials and Unmeasured Ability in the Labor Market For Nurses: Why Do Hospitals Pay More?," Working Papers, East Carolina University, Department of Economics 9604, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  3. Kostiuk, Peter F, 1990. "Compensating Differentials for Shift Work," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 1054-75, October.
  4. Ian Ayres & Steven D. Levitt, 1997. "Measuring Positive Externalities from Unobservable Victim Precaution: An Empirical Analysis of Lojack," NBER Working Papers 5928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1981. "The economics of staggered work hours," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 349-364, May.
  6. Viscusi, W Kip, 1993. "The Value of Risks to Life and Health," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 1912-46, December.
  7. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1999. "The Timing of Work over Time," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(452), pages 37-66, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Allen, W. David, 2013. "Self-protection against crime victimization: Theory and evidence from university campuses," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 21-33.
  2. David Albouy & Bert Lue, 2014. "Driving to Opportunity: Local Rents, Wages, Commuting Costs and Sub-Metropolitan Quality of Life," NBER Working Papers 19922, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Braakmann, Nils, 2012. "The link between non-property crime and house prices – Evidence from UK street-level data," MPRA Paper 44884, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2006. "Time Zones As Cues For Coordination: Latitude, Longitude, And Letterman," Middlebury College Working Paper Series, Middlebury College, Department of Economics 0609, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  5. repec:bri:cmpowp:13/312 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Janke, Katharina & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael, 2013. "Does Violent Crime Deter Physical Activity?," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 9605, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2003. "The Welfare Cost of Violence (New Version: Corrected Calculations)," Law and Economics, EconWPA 0312003, EconWPA, revised 13 Sep 2004.
  8. Braakmann, Nils, 2013. "Crime, health and wellbeing – Longitudinal evidence from Mexico," MPRA Paper 44885, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Eaton, B.Curtis & Wen, Jean-François, 2008. "Myopic deterrence policies and the instability of equilibria," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 65(3-4), pages 609-624, March.
  10. Soares, Rodrigo R., 2006. "The welfare cost of violence across countries," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 821-846, September.
  11. Braakmann, Nils, 2012. "How do individuals deal with victimization and victimization risk? Longitudinal evidence from Mexico," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 335-344.
  12. Renata Villoro & Graciela Teruel, 2004. "The social costs of crime in Mexico city and suburban areas," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 19(1), pages 3-44.
  13. Braakmann, Nils, 2009. "Is there a compensating wage differential for high crime levels? First evidence from Europe," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 218-231, November.

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