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State mood, task performance, and behavior at work: A within-persons approach

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  • Miner, Andrew G.
  • Glomb, Theresa M.
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    Abstract

    We examine the intra-individual relationships between state mood and the primary components of the individual-level criterion space (task performance, organizational citizenship behavior, and work withdrawal) as they vary within the stream of work. Using experience-sampling methods, 67 individuals in a call center responded to surveys on palmtop computers at random intervals 4-5 times each day for 3Â weeks (total NÂ =Â 2329). These data were matched to objective task performance obtained from organizational call records (total NÂ =Â 1191). Within-persons, periods of positive mood were associated with periods of improved task performance (as evidenced by shorter call time) and engaging in work withdrawal. Trait meta-mood moderated these relationships. Specifically, individuals who attended to their moods had a stronger relationship between mood and speed of task performance (call time) and individuals able to repair their mood cognitively evidenced a weaker relationship between mood and withdrawal. Implications and the use of within-persons designs are discussed.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 112 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (May)
    Pages: 43-57

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:112:y:2010:i:1:p:43-57

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

    Related research

    Keywords: Mood Performance Organizational citizenship behavior Work withdrawal Meta-mood;

    References

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    1. Estrada, Carlos A. & Isen, Alice M. & Young, Mark J., 1997. "Positive Affect Facilitates Integration of Information and Decreases Anchoring in Reasoning among Physicians," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 117-135, October.
    2. Brief, Arthur P., 2001. "Organizational Behavior and the Study of Affect: Keep Your Eyes on the Organization," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 131-139, September.
    3. Weiss, Howard M. & Nicholas, Jeffrey P. & Daus, Catherine S., 1999. "An Examination of the Joint Effects of Affective Experiences and Job Beliefs on Job Satisfaction and Variations in Affective Experiences over Time," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 1-24, April.
    4. Porath, Christine L. & Erez, Amir, 2009. "Overlooked but not untouched: How rudeness reduces onlookers' performance on routine and creative tasks," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 29-44, May.
    5. Ilies, Remus & Judge, Timothy A., 2002. "Understanding the dynamic relationships among personality, mood, and job satisfaction: A field experience sampling study," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 1119-1139, November.
    6. Sinclair, Robert C., 1988. "Mood, categorization breadth, and performance appraisal: The effects of order of information acquisition and affective state on halo, accuracy, information retrieval, and evaluations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 22-46, August.
    7. Noah Gans & Ger Koole & Avishai Mandelbaum, 2003. "Telephone Call Centers: Tutorial, Review, and Research Prospects," Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, INFORMS, vol. 5(2), pages 79-141, September.
    8. Kahn, Barbara E & Isen, Alice M, 1993. " The Influence of Positive Affect on Variety Seeking among Safe, Enjoyable Products," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(2), pages 257-70, September.
    9. Carnevale, Peter J. D. & Isen, Alice M., 1986. "The influence of positive affect and visual access on the discovery of integrative solutions in bilateral negotiation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-13, February.
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    Cited by:
    1. Drichoutis, Andreas & Nayga, Rodolfo & Klonaris, Stathis, 2010. "The Effects of Induced Mood on Preference Reversals and Bidding Behavior in Experimental Auction Valuation," MPRA Paper 25597, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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