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Are smarter groups more cooperative? Evidence from prisoner's dilemma experiments, 1959-2003

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  • Jones, Garett

Abstract

Are more intelligent groups better at cooperating? A meta-study of repeated prisoner's dilemma experiments run at numerous universities suggests that students cooperate 5-8% more often for every 100-point increase in the school's average SAT score. This result survives a variety of robustness tests. Axelrod [Axelrod, R., 1984. The Evolution of Cooperation. Basic Books, New York] recommends that the way to create cooperation is to encourage players to be patient and perceptive; experimental evidence suggests that more intelligent groups implicitly follow this advice.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 68 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3-4 (December)
Pages: 489-497

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:68:y:2008:i:3-4:p:489-497

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

Related research

Keywords: Intelligence IQ Prisoner's dilemma Cooperation Cognitive ability;

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Cited by:
  1. Potrafke, Niklas, 2012. "Intelligence and corruption," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(1), pages 109-112.
  2. Chen, Chia-Ching & Chiu, I-Ming & Smith, John & Yamada, Tetsuji, 2013. "Too smart to be selfish? Measures of cognitive ability, social preferences, and consistency," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 112-122.
  3. Christoph Engel, 2011. "Dictator games: a meta study," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 583-610, November.
  4. Omar Al-Ubaydli, 2009. "How Large Looms the Ghost of the Past? State-Dependence vs. Heterogeneity in the Stag Hunt," Working Papers 1010, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science.
  5. Cochard, François & Couprie, Hélène & Hopfensitz, Astrid, 2009. "Do Spouses Cooperate? And If Not: Why?," TSE Working Papers 09-134, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  6. Louis Puttermann & Jean-Robert Tyran & Kenju Kamei, 2010. "Public Goods and Voting on Formal Sanction Schemes: An Experiment," NRN working papers 2010-20, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  7. Björn Bartling & Nick Netzer, 2014. "An Externality-Robust Auction: Theory and Experimental Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 4771, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2012. "Governance and Intelligence: Empirical Analysis from African Data," MPRA Paper 39937, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Björn Bartling & Nick Netzer, 2014. "An externality-robust auction: theory and experimental evidence," ECON - Working Papers 153, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  10. Jones, Garett, 2012. "Cognitive skill and technology diffusion: An empirical test," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 444-460.
  11. John Nye & Gregory Androuschak & Desiree Desierto & Garett Jones & Maria Yudkevich, 2012. "What Determines Trust? Human Capital vs. Social Institutions: Evidence from Manila and Moscow," HSE Working papers WP BRP 18/EC/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  12. Chen, Shu-Heng, 2012. "Varieties of agents in agent-based computational economics: A historical and an interdisciplinary perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 1-25.
  13. Al-Ubaydli, Omar & Jones, Garett & Weel, Jaap, 2014. "Average player traits as predictors of cooperation in a repeated prisoner's dilemma," MPRA Paper 55383, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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