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The UK offshore wind power programme: A sea-change in UK energy policy?

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  • Toke, David
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    Abstract

    The British offshore windfarm programme presages the emergence of Britain as more of a leader than a laggard in renewables, the latter being the status it has hitherto endured in comparison to countries such as Denmark, Germany and Spain. Britain looks increasingly likely to exceed 20% of electricity being supplied from renewable energy by 2020, provided there continues to be adequate financial incentives for renewable energy. This turnaround is associated with increased British concerns about energy dependence on imported natural gas as well as pressure from EU legislation. However there are many planning pressures that countervail the drive for offshore wind power. British planning policy on offshore wind is distinctive (compared to other EU states) for its pragmatic, 'criteria based', approach that appears to favour offshore wind power development. The extent of the British offshore wind power programme is likely to depend heavily on consumer reactions to price increases caused by the offshore wind power programme.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 526-534

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:2:p:526-534

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

    Related research

    Keywords: Offshore wind power Planning Criteria-based;

    References

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    1. Wolsink, Maarten, 2000. "Wind power and the NIMBY-myth: institutional capacity and the limited significance of public support," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 49-64.
    2. West, J. & Bailey, I. & Winter, M., 2010. "Renewable energy policy and public perceptions of renewable energy: A cultural theory approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 5739-5748, October.
    3. Mitchell, Catherine & Connor, Peter, 2004. "Renewable energy policy in the UK 1990-2003," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(17), pages 1935-1947, November.
    4. Toke, Dave, 2005. "Explaining wind power planning outcomes:: some findings from a study in England and Wales," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 1527-1539, August.
    5. Mitchell, C. & Bauknecht, D. & Connor, P.M., 2006. "Effectiveness through risk reduction: a comparison of the renewable obligation in England and Wales and the feed-in system in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 297-305, February.
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    Cited by:
    1. Gurkan, G. & Langestraat, R., 2013. "Modeling And Analysis Of Renewable Energy Obligations And Technology Bandings In the UK Electricity Market," Discussion Paper 2013-016, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    2. Toke, David, 2011. "UK Electricity Market Reform—revolution or much ado about nothing?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7609-7611.
    3. Iskin, Ibrahim & Daim, Tugrul & Kayakutlu, Gulgun & Altuntas, Mehmet, 2012. "Exploring renewable energy pricing with analytic network process — Comparing a developed and a developing economy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 882-891.
    4. Mani, Swaminathan & Dhingra, Tarun, 2013. "Offshore wind energy policy for India—Key factors to be considered," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 672-683.
    5. Giuseppe Bellantuono, 2014. "The regulatory anticommons of green infrastructures," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 325-354, April.
    6. Iglesias, Guillermo & del Río, Pablo & Dopico, Jesús Ángel, 2011. "Policy analysis of authorisation procedures for wind energy deployment in Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4067-4076, July.
    7. Mani, Swaminathan & Dhingra, Tarun, 2013. "Critique of offshore wind energy policies of the UK and Germany—What are the lessons for India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 900-909.
    8. Jacobsson, Staffan & Karltorp, Kersti, 2013. "Mechanisms blocking the dynamics of the European offshore wind energy innovation system – Challenges for policy intervention," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1182-1195.
    9. Jay, Stephen, 2011. "Mobilising for marine wind energy in the United Kingdom," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4125-4133, July.
    10. Langestraat, R., 2013. "Environmental policies in competitive electricity markets," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-5930365, Tilburg University.

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