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Climate change and electricity consumption--Witnessing increasing or decreasing use and costs?

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  • Pilli-Sihvola, Karoliina
  • Aatola, Piia
  • Ollikainen, Markku
  • Tuomenvirta, Heikki

Abstract

Climate change affects the need for heating and cooling. This paper examines the impact of gradually warming climate on the need for heating and cooling with an econometric multivariate regression model for five countries in Europe along the south-north line. The predicted changes in electricity demand are then used to analyze how climate change impacts the cost of electricity use, including carbon costs. Our main findings are, that in Central and North Europe, the decrease in heating due to climate warming, dominates and thus costs will decrease for both users of electricity and in carbon markets. In Southern Europe climate warming, and the consequential increase in cooling and electricity demand, overcomes the decreased need for heating. Therefore costs also increase. The main contributors are the role of electricity in heating and cooling, and the climatic zone.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 2409-2419

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Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:5:p:2409-2419

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

Related research

Keywords: Climate change Electricity demand Costs of climate change;

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Cited by:
  1. Suganthi, L. & Samuel, Anand A., 2012. "Energy models for demand forecasting—A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 1223-1240.
  2. Zhu, Dan & Tao, Shu & Wang, Rong & Shen, Huizhong & Huang, Ye & Shen, Guofeng & Wang, Bin & Li, Wei & Zhang, Yanyan & Chen, Han & Chen, Yuanchen & Liu, Junfeng & Li, Bengang & Wang, Xilong & Liu, Wenx, 2013. "Temporal and spatial trends of residential energy consumption and air pollutant emissions in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 17-24.
  3. Bašta, Milan & Helman, Karel, 2013. "Scale-specific importance of weather variables for explanation of variations of electricity consumption: The case of Prague, Czech Republic," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 503-514.
  4. Jane Ebinger & Walter Vergara, 2011. "Climate Impacts on Energy Systems : Key Issues for Energy Sector Adaptation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2271, October.

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