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The non-linear link between electricity consumption and temperature in Europe: A threshold panel approach

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  • Bessec, Marie
  • Fouquau, Julien

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between electricity demand and temperature in the European Union. We address this issue by means of a panel threshold regression model on 15 European countries over the last two decades. Our results confirm the non-linearity of the link between electricity consumption and temperature found in more limited geographical areas in previous studies. By distinguishing between North and South countries, we also find that this non-linear pattern is more pronounced in the warm countries. Finally, rolling regressions show that the sensitivity of electricity consumption to temperature in summer has increased in the recent period.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (September)
Pages: 2705-2721

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:5:p:2705-2721

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Cited by:
  1. Gupta, Eshita, 2012. "Global warming and electricity demand in the rapidly growing city of Delhi: A semi-parametric variable coefficient approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1407-1421.
  2. McDermott, Grant R. & Nilsen, Øivind Anti, 2012. "Electricity Prices, River Temperatures and Cooling Water Scarcity," IZA Discussion Papers 6842, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Richard S. J. Tol & Sebastian Petrick & Katrin Rehdanz, 2012. "The Impact of Temperature Changes on Residential Energy Use," Working Paper Series 4412, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
  4. Suganthi, L. & Samuel, Anand A., 2012. "Energy models for demand forecasting—A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 1223-1240.
  5. Hekkenberg, M. & Benders, R.M.J. & Moll, H.C. & Schoot Uiterkamp, A.J.M., 2009. "Indications for a changing electricity demand pattern: The temperature dependence of electricity demand in the Netherlands," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1542-1551, April.
  6. Richard Tol, 2013. "The economic impact of climate change in the 20th and 21st centuries," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(4), pages 795-808, April.
  7. Delatte, Anne-Laure & Fouquau, Julien, 2009. "The Determinants of International Reserves in the Emerging Countries: a Non-Linear Approach," MPRA Paper 16311, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Blazquez Leticia & Nina Boogen & Massimo Filippini, 2012. "Residential electricity demand for Spain: new empirical evidence using aggregated data," CEPE Working paper series 12-82, CEPE Center for Energy Policy and Economics, ETH Zurich.
  9. Desiderio Romero-Jordán & Pablo del Río & Cristina Peñasco, 2014. "Household electricity demand in Spanish regions. Public policy implications," Working Papers 2014/24, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  10. Nabil Aflouk & Jacques Mazier, 2013. "Exchange rate misalignments and economic growth: A threshold panel approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1333-1347.
  11. Bašta, Milan & Helman, Karel, 2013. "Scale-specific importance of weather variables for explanation of variations of electricity consumption: The case of Prague, Czech Republic," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 503-514.
  12. Kani, Alireza H. & Abbasspour, Madjid & Abedi, Zahra, 2014. "Estimation of demand function for natural gas in Iran: Evidences based on smooth transition regression models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 341-347.
  13. David Anthoff & Richard Tol, 2013. "The uncertainty about the social cost of carbon: A decomposition analysis using fund," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 515-530, April.
  14. Chevallier, Julien, 2009. "Carbon futures and macroeconomic risk factors : a view from the EU ETS," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/4210, Paris Dauphine University.
  15. Räsänen, Teemu & Voukantsis, Dimitrios & Niska, Harri & Karatzas, Kostas & Kolehmainen, Mikko, 2010. "Data-based method for creating electricity use load profiles using large amount of customer-specific hourly measured electricity use data," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 87(11), pages 3538-3545, November.
  16. Rainald Borck, 2014. "Will Skyscrapers Save the Planet? Building Height Limits and Urban Greenhouse Gas Emissions," CESifo Working Paper Series 4773, CESifo Group Munich.
  17. Yoosoon Chang & Chang Sik Kim & J. Isaac Miller & Joon Y. Park & Sungkeun Park, 2014. "Time-varying Long-run Income and Output Elasticities of Electricity Demand," Working Papers 1409, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  18. Duarte, Rosa & Pinilla, Vicente & Serrano, Ana, 2013. "Is there an environmental Kuznets curve for water use? A panel smooth transition regression approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 518-527.
  19. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2011. "Electricity demand elasticities and temperature: Evidence from panel smooth transition regression with instrumental variable approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 896-902, September.

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