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The impact of challenge gifts on charitable giving: an experimental investigation

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  • List, John A.
  • Rondeau, Daniel

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 79 (2003)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 153-159

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:79:y:2003:i:2:p:153-159

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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References

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  1. Rondeau, Daniel & Schulze, William D. & Poe, Gregory L., 1997. "Voluntary Revelation Of The Demand For Public Goods Using A Provision Point Mechanism," Working Papers 7265, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  2. Cadsby, Charles Bram & Maynes, Elizabeth, 1999. "Voluntary provision of threshold public goods with continuous contributions: experimental evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 53-73, January.
  3. James Andreoni, 1998. "Toward a Theory of Charitable Fund-Raising," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1186-1213, December.
  4. John A. List & David Lucking-Reiley, 2000. "The Effects of Seed Money and Refunds on Charitable Giving: Experimental Evidence from a University Capital Campaign," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0008, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  5. Potters, J.J.M. & Sefton, M. & Vesterlund, L., 2001. "Why Announce Leadership Contributions? An Experimental Study of the Signaling and Reciprocity Hypotheses," Discussion Paper 2001-100, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Rondeau & John A. List, 2008. "Matching and Challenge Gifts to Charity:Evidence from Laboratory and Natural Field Experiments," NBER Working Papers 13728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. John A. List, 2014. "Using Field Experiments to Change the Template of How We Teach Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(2), pages 81-89, June.
  3. Julian Rauchdobler & Rupert Sausgruber & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2009. "Voting on Thresholds for Public Goods: Experimental Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 2896, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. David Hugh-Jones & David Reinstein, 2009. "Anonymous Rituals," Economics Discussion Papers 670, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  5. de Oliveira, Angela C.M. & Croson, Rachel T.A. & Eckel, Catherine, 2011. "The giving type: Identifying donors," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(5), pages 428-435.
  6. Jeffery Flory & Uri Gneezy & Kenneth Leonard & John List, 2012. "Sex, competitiveness, and investment in offspring: On the origin of preferences," Artefactual Field Experiments 00072, The Field Experiments Website.
  7. Ronald J. Baker II & James M. Walker & Arlington W. Williams, 2006. "Matching Contributions and the Voluntary Provision of a Pure Public Good: Experimental Evidence," Caepr Working Papers 2006-007, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington, revised Dec 2007.
  8. Newman, George E. & Jeremy Shen, Y., 2012. "The counterintuitive effects of thank-you gifts on charitable giving," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 973-983.
  9. Yan Chen & Xin Li & Jeffrey MacKie-Mason, 2006. "Online fund-raising mechanisms: A field experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00225, The Field Experiments Website.
  10. Jiří Špalek & Zuzana Berná, 2011. "Threshold Effectiveness in Contributing to the Public Goods: Experiments Involving Czech Students," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2011(3), pages 250-267.
  11. Daniel Houser & David M. Levy & Kail Padgitt & Sandra J. Peart & Erte Xiao, 2014. "Raising the Price of Talk: An Experimental Analysis of Transparent Leadership," Working Papers 1048, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science.
  12. Stephan Meier, 2005. "Do subsidies increase charitable giving in the long run? Matching donations in a field experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00308, The Field Experiments Website.
  13. Waldman, Kurt B. & Kerr, John M. & Isaacs, Krista B., 2014. "Combining participatory crop trials and experimental auctions to estimate farmer preferences for improved common bean in Rwanda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 183-192.

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