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The pro-trade effect of the brain drain: Sorting out confounding factors

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  • Felbermayr, Gabriel J.
  • Jung, Benjamin

Abstract

We sort out confounding factors in the empirical link between bilateral migration and trade. Using newly available panel data on developing countries' diaspora to rich OECD nations in a theory-grounded gravity model, we uncover a robust, causal pro-trade effect. Moreover, we do not find evidence in favor of strong differences across education groups.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 104 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (August)
Pages: 72-75

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:104:y:2009:i:2:p:72-75

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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Keywords: Gravity model International trade International migration;

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  1. Frédéric Docquier & Elisabetta Lodigiani, 2007. "Skilled Migration and Business Networks," Development Working Papers 234, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  2. Kugler, Maurice & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "International labor and capital flows: Complements or substitutes?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 155-162, February.
  3. Scott L. Baier & Jeffrey H. Bergstrand, 2005. "Do free trade agreements actually increase members’ international trade?," Working Paper 2005-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  4. Robert E.B. Lucas, 2006. "Migration and Economic Development in Africa: A Review of Evidence," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(2), pages 337-395, December.
  5. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Cletus C. Coughlin & Howard J. Wall, 2007. "Ethnic networks and U.S. exports," Working Papers 2005-069, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  6. Baldwin, Richard & Taglioni, Daria, 2006. "Gravity for Dummies and Dummies for Gravity Equations," CEPR Discussion Papers 5850, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Wagner, Don & Head, Keith & Ries, John, 2002. "Immigration and the Trade of Provinces," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(5), pages 507-25, December.
  8. Baltagi, Badi H. & Egger, Peter & Pfaffermayr, Michael, 2003. "A generalized design for bilateral trade flow models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 391-397, September.
  9. Michel Beine & Fréderic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2008. "Brain Drain and Human Capital Formation in Developing Countries: Winners and Losers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 631-652, 04.
  10. James A. Dunlevy, 2006. "The Influence of Corruption and Language on the Protrade Effect of Immigrants: Evidence from the American States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 182-186, February.
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