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Guessing with negative feedback: An experiment

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  • Sutan, Angela
  • Willinger, Marc

Abstract

We investigate experimentally a new variant of the beauty contest game (BCG) in which players' actions are strategic substitutes (a negative feedback BCG). Our results show that chosen numbers are closer to the rational expectation equilibrium than in a strategic complements environment (a positive feedback BCG). We also find that the estimated average depth of reasoning from the cognitive hierarchy model does not differ between the two environments. We show that the difference may be attributed to the fact that additional information is more valuable when players' actions are strategic substitutes rather than strategic complements, in line with other recent experimental findings.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 33 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 1123-1133

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:33:y:2009:i:5:p:1123-1133

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jedc

Related research

Keywords: Guessing games Negative feedback Strategic substitutes vs. strategic complements;

References

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  1. Güth, Werner & Kocher, Martin G. & Sutter, Matthias, 2002. "Experimental 'beauty contests' with homogeneous and heterogeneous players and with interior and boundary equilibria," Munich Reprints in Economics 18165, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
  3. Ernst Fehr & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2007. "Limited Rationality And Strategic Interaction: The Impact Of The Strategic Environment On Nominal Inertia," CAMA Working Papers 2007-26, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. Nagel, Rosemarie, 1995. "Unraveling in Guessing Games: An Experimental Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1313-26, December.
  5. Angela Sutan & Marc Willinger, 2006. "Raisonnement divinatoire à feedback négatif. Une investigation expérimentale," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 57(2), pages 281-295.
  6. Stahl, Dale O., 1998. "Is step-j thinking an arbitrary modelling restriction or a fact of human nature?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 33-51, September.
  7. John Haltiwanger & Michael Waldman, 1983. "Rational Expectations and the Limits of Rationality: An Analysis of Heterogeneity," UCLA Economics Working Papers 303, UCLA Department of Economics.
  8. Guesnerie, R., 1989. "An Exploration of the Eductive Justifications of the Rational Expectations Hypotbesis," DELTA Working Papers 89-24, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  9. Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson & Guillermo Moloche & Stephen Weinberg, 2006. "Costly Information Acquisition: Experimental Analysis of a Boundedly Rational Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1043-1068, September.
  10. Stahl, Dale O., 1996. "Boundedly Rational Rule Learning in a Guessing Game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 303-330, October.
  11. Binmore, Ken, 1988. "Modeling Rational Players: Part II," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(01), pages 9-55, April.
  12. Haltiwanger, John C & Waldman, Michael, 1989. "Limited Rationality and Strategic Complements: The Implications for Macroeconomics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(3), pages 463-83, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lambsdorff, Johann Graf & Schubert, Manuel & Giamattei, Marcus, 2013. "On the role of heuristics—Experimental evidence on inflation dynamics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1213-1229.
  2. Sonnemans, Joep & Tuinstra, Jan, 2010. "Positive expectations feedback experiments and number guessing games as models of financial markets," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 964-984, December.
  3. Tedeschi, Gabriele & Iori, Giulia & Gallegati, Mauro, 2012. "Herding effects in order driven markets: The rise and fall of gurus," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 82-96.
  4. Heemeijer, P. & Hommes, C.H. & Sonnemans, J. & Tuinstra, J., 2006. "Price Stability and Volatility in Markets with Positive and Negative Expectations Feedback: An Experimental Investigation," CeNDEF Working Papers 06-05, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
  5. Eizo Akiyama & Nobuyuki Hanaki & Ryuichiro Ishikawa, 2012. "Effect of Uncertainty about Others' Rationality in Experimental Asset Markets: An Experimental Analysis," Working Papers halshs-00793613, HAL.
  6. Mikhail Anufriev & Cars Hommes & Raoul Philipse, 2013. "Evolutionary selection of expectations in positive and negative feedback markets," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 663-688, July.
  7. Bao, Te & Duffy, John, 2014. "Adaptive vs. eductive learning: Theory and evidence," Research Report 14002-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
  8. Eizo Akiyama & Nobuyuki Hanaki & Ryuichiro Ishikawa, 2013. "It is Not Just Confusion! Strategic Uncertainty in an Experimental Asset Market," Working Papers halshs-00854513, HAL.
  9. Hommes, Cars, 2011. "The heterogeneous expectations hypothesis: Some evidence from the lab," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-24, January.
  10. Eizo Akiyama & Nobuyuki Hanaki & Ryuchiro Ishikawa, 2012. "Effect of uncertainty about others’ rationality in experimental asset markets," AMSE Working Papers 1234, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.

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