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Developing science: Scientific performance and brain drains in the developing world

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  • Weinberg, Bruce A.

Abstract

Establishing a strong scientific community is important as countries develop and requires both producing and retaining of important scientists. We show that developing countries produce a sizeable number of important scientists, but that they experience a tremendous brain drain. Education levels, population, and per capita GDP are positively related to the number of important scientists born in and staying in a country. Our analysis indicates that democracy and urbanization are associated with the production of more important scientists although democracy is associated with more out-migration.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 95 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (May)
Pages: 95-104

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:95:y:2011:i:1:p:95-104

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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Keywords: Science of science Development Brain drain Innovation;

References

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  12. Simon Commander & Mari Kangasniemi & L. Alan Winters, 2004. "The Brain Drain: Curse or Boon? A Survey of the Literature," NBER Chapters, in: Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics, pages 235-278 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1998. "Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing or a "curse"?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 363-367, September.
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  16. Rosalind S Hunter, 2009. "The Elite Brain Drain," Working Papers id:2048, eSocialSciences.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Okey K. N. Mawussé, 2013. "Institutions and scientific research in Africa," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1487-1503.
  2. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano, 2012. "Middle-income growth traps," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6210, The World Bank.
  3. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2013. "Scientific Mobility and Knowledge Networks in High Emigration Countries: Evidence from the Pacific," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1305, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Carol McAusland & Peter J. Kuhn, 2009. "Bidding for Brains: Intellectual Property Rights and the International Migration of Knowledge Workers," NBER Working Papers 15486, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. William R. Kerr, 2013. "U.S. High-Skilled Immigration, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Empirical Approaches and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 19377, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Otaviano Canuto & Michael Jelenic, 2012. "Avoiding Middle-Income Growth Traps," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 98, pages 1-7, November.
  7. Duarte Leite & Óscar Afonso & Sandra Silva, 2014. "A tale of two countries: a directed technical change approach," FEP Working Papers 539, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

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