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Impacts of the Productive Safety Net Program in Ethiopia on livestock and tree holdings of rural households

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  • Andersson, Camilla
  • Mekonnen, Alemu
  • Stage, Jesper

Abstract

We evaluated the impacts of the Ethiopian Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP) on rural households' holdings of livestock and forest assets/trees. We found no indication that participation in PSNP induces households to disinvest in livestock or trees. In fact, households that participated in the program increased the number of trees planted, but there was no increase in their livestock holdings. We found no strong evidence that the PSNP protects livestock in times of shock. Shocks appear to lead households to disinvest in livestock, but not in trees. Our results suggest that there is increased forestry activity as a result of PSNP, and that improved credit access encourages households to increase their livestock holdings.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 94 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 119-126

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:94:y:2011:i:1:p:119-126

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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Keywords: Trees Livestock Safety nets Ethiopia;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Yu Chen & Sylvie Démurger, 2014. "Pro-rural policies, income and inequality : Evaluating a cash-for-work program in rural China," Working Papers 1415, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  2. Mogues, Tewodaj & Petracco, Carly & Randriamamonjy, Josee, 2011. "The wealth and gender distribution of rural services in Ethiopia: A public expenditure benefit Incidence Analysis," ESSP working papers 33, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Tusiime, Hamidu A. & Renard, Robrecht & Smets, Lodewijk, 2013. "Food aid and household food security in a conflict situation: Empirical evidence from Northern Uganda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 14-22.
  4. Dambala Gelo & Steven F. Koch, 2011. "Contingent Valuation of Community Forestry Programs in Ethiopia: Observing Preference Anomalies in Double-Bounded CVM," Working Papers 201124, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  5. Kumasi, Tyhra Carolyn & Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo, 2011. "Responding to land degradation in the highlands of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Alem, Yonas & Broussard, Nzinga H., 2013. "Do Safety Nets Promote Technology Adoption? Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers in Economics 556, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  7. Yu Chen & Sylvie Démurger, 2014. "Pro-rural policies, income and inequality : Evaluating a cash-for-work program in rural China," Working Papers halshs-00993574, HAL.
  8. Ameha, Aklilu & Nielsen, Oystein Juul & Larsen, Helle Overgard, 2014. "Impacts of access and benefit sharing on livelihoods and forest: Case of participatory forest management in Ethiopia," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 162-171.
  9. World Bank, 2012. "Resilience, Equity, and Opportunity," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12648, The World Bank.
  10. Barrientos, Armando & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2010. "Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database Version 5.0," MPRA Paper 20001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Rodrigo, María F, 2013. "Public Works in Ethiopia. Crowding out on-farm labor?," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150806, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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