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Respect in the workplace: A mixed methods study of retention and turnover in the voluntary child welfare sector

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  • Augsberger, Astraea
  • Schudrich, Wendy
  • McGowan, Brenda G.
  • Auerbach, Charles
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    Abstract

    A significant challenge facing the child welfare system is the recruitment and retention of a stable and qualified workforce. Several studies have identified individual and organizational factors impacting workforce turnover. The current study expands upon previous research by utilizing a mixed methods design to examine the relationship between workers' perceptions of respect in the workplace and their intention to leave. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data revealed that workers perceive a lack of respect in five domains including organizational support, fair salary and benefits, fair promotion potential, adequate communication and contingent rewards. Based on the qualitative findings, researchers designed the Respect Scale, a quantitative scale measuring the concept perceived respect. Results from the logistic regression found that workers who score lower on the Respect Scale were significantly more likely to intend to leave their current job. Research and practice implications are discussed.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Children and Youth Services Review.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 7 ()
    Pages: 1222-1229

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:34:y:2012:i:7:p:1222-1229

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth

    Related research

    Keywords: Worker retention and turnover; Job satisfaction; Mixed methods; Perceived respect;

    References

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    1. Auerbach, Charles & McGowan, Brenda G. & Ausberger, Astraea & Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica & Schudrich, Wendy, 2010. "Differential factors influencing public and voluntary child welfare workers' intention to leave," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1396-1402, October.
    2. Strand, Virginia C. & Dore, Martha Morrison, 2009. "Job satisfaction in a stable state child welfare workforce: Implications for staff retention," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 391-397, March.
    3. Yankeelov, Pamela A. & Barbee, Anita P. & Sullivan, Dana & Antle, Becky F., 2009. "Individual and organizational factors in job retention in Kentucky's child welfare agency," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 547-554, May.
    4. Ellett, Alberta J. & Ellis, Jacquelyn I. & Westbrook, Tonya M. & Dews, Denise', 2007. "A qualitative study of 369 child welfare professionals' perspectives about factors contributing to employee retention and turnover," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 264-281, February.
    5. Siegrist, Johannes & Starke, Dagmar & Chandola, Tarani & Godin, Isabelle & Marmot, Michael & Niedhammer, Isabelle & Peter, Richard, 2004. "The measurement of effort-reward imbalance at work: European comparisons," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(8), pages 1483-1499, April.
    6. Smith, Brenda D., 2005. "Job retention in child welfare: Effects of perceived organizational support, supervisor support, and intrinsic job value," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 153-169, February.
    7. DePanfilis, Diane & Zlotnik, Joan Levy, 2008. "Retention of front-line staff in child welfare: A systematic review of research," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 995-1008, September.
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    Cited by:
    1. Zeitlin, Wendy & Augsberger, Astraea & Auerbach, Charles & McGowan, Brenda, 2014. "A mixed-methods study of the impact of organizational culture on workforce retention in child welfare," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 36-43.
    2. Boyas, Javier F. & Wind, Leslie H. & Ruiz, Erika, 2013. "Organizational tenure among child welfare workers, burnout, stress, and intent to leave: Does employment-based social capital make a difference?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1657-1669.

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