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Market access by smallholder farmers in Malawi: implications for technology adoption, agricultural productivity and crop income

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  • Zeller, Manfred
  • Diagne, Aliou
  • Mataya, Charles

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Blackwell in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1-2 (September)
Pages: 219-229

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Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:19:y:1998:i:1-2:p:219-229

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Web page: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/agec

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. von Braun, Joachim & Puetz, Detlev & Webb, Patrick, 1989. "Irrigation technology and commercialization of rice in the Gambia: effects on income and nutrition," Research reports 75, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Smale, Melinda & Heisey, Paul W & Leathers, Howard D, 1995. "Maize of the Ancestors and Modern Varieties: The Microeconomics of High-Yielding Variety Adoption in Malawi," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 351-68, January.
  3. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
  4. Kumar, Shubh K., 1994. "Adoption of hybrid maize in Zambia: effects on gender roles, food consumption, and nutrition," Research reports 100, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2010. "Market and climatic risks and farmers' investment in productive assets under the Second Fadama Development Project in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1033, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Christina Handschuch & Meike Wollni, 2013. "Traditional food crop marketing in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does gender matter?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 142, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  3. Binam, Joachim Nyemeck & Tonye, Jean & wandji, Njankoua & Nyambi, Gwendoline & Akoa, Mireille, 2004. "Factors affecting the technical efficiency among smallholder farmers in the slash and burn agriculture zone of Cameroon," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 531-545, October.
  4. Diagne, Aliou, 1998. "Impact of access to credit on income and food security in Malawi," FCND discussion papers 46, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Akinola, Adebayo A. & Arega, D.A. & Adeyemo, Remi & Sanogo, Diakalia & Olanrewaju, Adetunji S. & Nwoke, C. & Nzigaheba, G. & Diels, J., 2008. "Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of balanced nutrient management systems technologies in the northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria," 2007 Second International Conference, August 20-22, 2007, Accra, Ghana 52007, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  6. Ryan, James G., 1999. "Assessing the impact of policy research and capacity building by IFPRI in Malawi:," Impact assessments 11, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Holden, Stein, 2013. "Input subsidies and demand for improved maize: Relative prices and household heterogeneity matter!," CLTS Working Papers 6/13, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
  8. Hanjra, Munir A. & Ferede, Tadele & Gutta, Debel Gemechu, 2009. "Reducing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa through investments in water and other priorities," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(7), pages 1062-1070, July.
  9. Prowse, Martin, 2011. "A comparative value chain analysis of burley tobacco in Malawi - 2003/04 and 2009/10," IOB Working Papers 2011.09, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB).
  10. Kenneth, Akankwasa & Gerald, Ortmann & Edilegnaw, Wale & Wilberforce, Tushemereirwe, 2012. "Ex-Ante Adoption of New Cooking Banana (Matooke) Hybrids in Uganda Based on Farmers' Perceptions," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 123302, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  11. Matuschke, Ira & Mishra, Ritesh R. & Qaim, Matin, 2007. "Adoption and Impact of Hybrid Wheat in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1422-1435, August.
  12. Franklin Simtowe & Manfred Zeller & Aliou Diagne, 2009. "The impact of credit constraints on the adoption of hybrid maize in Malawi," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 90(1), pages 5-22.
  13. Diagne, Aliou, 1999. "Determinants of household access to and participation in formal and informal credit markets in Malawi," FCND discussion papers 67, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Tite Ehuitché Beke, 2011. "Institutional constraints and adoption of improved rice varieties: Econometric evidence from Ivory Coast," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 92(2), pages 117-141.
  15. Tchale, Hardwick & Sauer, Johannes, 2008. "Soil Fertility Management And Maize Productivity In Malawi: Curvature Correct Efficiency Modeling And Simulation," 2007 Second International Conference, August 20-22, 2007, Accra, Ghana 52077, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  16. Alwang, Jeffrey & Siegel, Paul B., 2003. "Measuring the impacts of agricultural research on poverty reduction," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 1-14, July.
  17. Tothova, Monika & Meyers, William H., 2006. "Modelling the Acceptance of High Beta-carotene Maize," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21457, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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