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Politique d'infrastructure et choix de localisation dans un modèle de signal

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  • Jean-Philippe Tropeano

Abstract

L'agglomération spatiale des firmes est un phénomène largement débattu en économie géographique. Cet article propose une nouvelle explication à ce phénomène : les entreprises mettent en avant la localisation comme un moyen de signaler un bien nouveau. Accepter la concurrence en se localisant au plus près des entreprises existantes permet de montrer aux consommateurs la valeur du produit vendu. La polarisation géographique, et par là même une plus grande concurrence, sert de faire-valoir à une innovation. On montre que la firme innovante se localise dans la même région que la firme concurrente uniquement si le produit qu'elle propose est suffisamment innovant. Le critère de raffinement "K-undefeated" assure l'unicité de l'équilibre semi-séparateur. La polarisation de l'activité est uniquement im¬putable à l'asymétrie d'information. Cette forte polarisation doit inciter les autorités supra-régionales à privilégier plutôt les infrastructures de désen-clavement qui se traduisent par une forte baisse des coûts de transport. En effet, une faible baisse du coût de transport peut se traduire par une baisse du bien-être total.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by De Boeck Université in its journal Recherches économiques de Louvain.

Volume (Year): 69 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 407-438

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Handle: RePEc:cai:reldbu:rel_694_0407

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  1. Edward L. Glaeser, 1997. "Learning in Cities," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1814, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1998. "Innovation in Cities: Science-Based Diversity, Specialization and Localized Competition," CEPR Discussion Papers 1980, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & John Van Reenen, 1994. "Dynamic count data models of technological innovation," IFS Working Papers W94/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  4. Martin, Philippe & Rogers, Carol Ann, 1995. "Industrial location and public infrastructure," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 335-351, November.
  5. Guy Dumais & Glenn Ellison & Edward Glaeser, 1997. "Geographic Concentration as a Dynamic Process," NBER Working Papers 6270, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Gianmarco Ottaviano & Takatoshi Tabuchi & Jacques-FranÁois Thisse, 2002. "Agglomeration and Trade Revisited," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(2), pages 409-436, May.
  7. Rauch, James E, 1993. "Does History Matter Only When It Matters Little? The Case of City-Industry Location," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(3), pages 843-67, August.
  8. John M. Quigley, 1998. "Urban Diversity and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 127-138, Spring.
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