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Measuring Pro-Poorness: A Unifying Approach With New Results

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  • B. Essama-Nssah
  • Peter J. Lambert
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    Abstract

    Recent economic literature on pro-poor growth measurement is drawn together, using a common analytical framework which lends itself to some significant extensions. First, a new class of pro-poorness measures is defined, to complement existing classes, with similarities and differences which are fully discussed. Second, all of these measures of pro-poorness can be decomposed across income sources or components of consumption expenditure (depending on the application). This permits the analyst to "unbundle" a pattern of growth, revealing the contributions to overall pro-poorness of constituent parts. Third, all of these pro-poorness measures can be modified to measure pro-poorness at percentiles. An application to consumption expenditures in Indonesia in the 1990s reveals that the poverty reduction achieved remains far below what would have been achieved under distributional neutrality. This can be tracked back to changes in expenditure components. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation International Association for Research in Income and Wealth 2009.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by International Association for Research in Income and Wealth in its journal Review of Income and Wealth.

    Volume (Year): 55 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 3 (09)
    Pages: 752-778

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:55:y:2009:i:3:p:752-778

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    Cited by:
    1. V. Peragine & F. Palmisano & P. Brunori, 2011. "Economic growth and equality of opportunity," series 0037, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Metodi Matematici - Università di Bari, revised Oct 2011.
    2. Thomas Groll & Peter J. Lambert, 2013. "The Pro-Poorness, Growth and Inequality Nexus: Some Findings From a Simulation Study," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(4), pages 776-784, December.
    3. Francisco Azpitarte, 2012. "Was Economic Growth in Australia Good for the Income-Poor? and for the Multidimensionally-Poor?," Working Papers 278, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    4. Buhong Zheng, 2011. "Consistent comparison of pro-poor growth," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 61-79, June.
    5. Essama-Nssah, B. & Bassole, Leandre, 2010. "A counterfactual analysis of the poverty impact of economic growth in Cameroon," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5249, The World Bank.
    6. B. Essama-Nssah & Peter J. Lambert, 2013. "Counterfactual decomposition of pro-poorness using influence functions," Working Papers 309, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    7. B. Essama-Nssah & Peter J. Lambert, 2011. "Influence functions for distributional statistics," Working Papers 236, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    8. Flaviana Palmisano & Dirk Van de gaer, 2013. "History dependent growth incidence: A characterisation and an application to the economic crisis in Italy," Working Papers 314, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    9. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Van Kerm, Philippe, 2011. "Trends in Individual Income Growth: Measurement Methods and British Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 5510, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Essama-Nssah, B., 2012. "Identification of sources of variation in poverty outcomes," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5954, The World Bank.
    11. B. Essama-Nssah & Saumik Paul & Léandre Bassolé, 2013. "Accounting for Heterogeneity in Growth Incidence in Cameroon Using Recentered Influence Function Regression," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(5), pages 757-795, November.
    12. Daniel Sotelsek-Salem & Ismael Ahamdanech-Zarco & John Bishop, 2012. "Dominance testing for ‘pro-poor’ growth with an application to European growth," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 723-739, October.
    13. Francisco Azpitarte, 2014. "Was Pro-Poor Economic Growth in Australia for the Income-Poor? And for the Multidimensionally-Poor?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 871-905, July.

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