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Political Competition Between Countries and Economic Growth

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  • Azam Chaudhry
  • Phillip Garner

Abstract

Political competition between European countries has been viewed as being a stimulus to the innovation process and part of the reason why Europe was the first region of the world to experience sustained growth. Countries that fell behind their rivals technologically and economically became more vulnerable to exploitation. In this way, the presence of rival states provided added incentive to innovate. This paper uses a simple model of conflict between countries to study the role of political competition in economic growth. The governments of each country are threatened politically by innovation and, hence, face a trade-off between the stability of their regime and keeping up with their rivals. The model shows that "institutional spillovers," such as a decrease in the level of rent-seeking in one country, can affect growth in a competing country. Thus, political fragmentation can be growth enhancing as it can result in more political competition. Copyright � 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation � 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Review of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 10 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 666-682

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Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:10:y:2006:i:4:p:666-682

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Cited by:
  1. Chaudhry, Azam & Garner, Phillip, 2013. "The political economy of income comparisons and economic growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 214-222.
  2. Cem Karayalçin, 2008. "Divided We Stand, United We Fall: The Hume-North-Jones Mechanism For The Rise Of Europe," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(3), pages 973-997, 08.
  3. Chaudhry, Azam & Bukhari, Syed Kalim Hyder, 2013. "A structural VAR analysis of the impact of macroeconomic shocks on Pakistan's textile exports," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 302-315.
  4. Angus Chu, 2010. "Nation states vs. united empire: Effects of political competition on economic growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 181-195, October.
  5. Azam Chaudhry, 2011. "Tariffs, Trade and Economic Growth in a Institutionals Quality," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 31-54, Jul-Dec.
  6. Cem Karayalcin, 2005. "Divided We Stand, United We Fall: The Hume-Weber-Jones Mechanism for the Rise of Europe," Working Papers 0509, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
  7. Phillip Garner, 2008. "Congo and Korea: a study in divergence," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 326-346.

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