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Congo and Korea: a study in divergence

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  • Phillip Garner

    (Brigham Young University, Provo, USA)

Abstract

The growth experiences of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Korea over the last several decades have been polar opposites. Despite this divergence in economic outcomes, the two countries shared some initial similarities including very low income, high population growth rates, harsh colonial regimes, military coups and Cold War politics. There were also important initial differences in population density, ethnolinguistic diversity, natural resource endowments and geography. Given its enormous mineral wealth, economic prospects initially appeared brighter in the Congo than in Korea to most contemporary observers. This paper explores the possible causes of divergences in the two countries by examining initial conditions, economic and demographic trends, geography and governance. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1418
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 20 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 326-346

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:20:y:2008:i:3:p:326-346

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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  1. William Easterly & Alberto Alesina & Janina Matuszeski, 2006. "Artificial States," Working Papers, Center for Global Development 100, Center for Global Development.
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Cited by:
  1. Minoiu, Camelia & Reddy, Sanjay G., 2010. "Development aid and economic growth: A positive long-run relation," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 27-39, February.

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