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On Stock Market Returns and Monetary Policy

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  • Thorbecke, Willem

Abstract

Financial economists have long debated whether monetary policy is neutral. This article addresses this question by examining how stock return data respond to monetary policy shocks. Monetary policy is measured by innovations in the federal funds rate and nonborrowed reserves, by narrative indicators, and by an event study of Federal Reserve policy changes. In every case the evidence indicates that expansionary policy increases ex post stock returns. Results from estimating a multifactor model also indicate that exposure to monetary policy increases an asset's ex ante return. Copyright 1997 by American Finance Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Finance Association in its journal Journal of Finance.

Volume (Year): 52 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 635-54

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jfinan:v:52:y:1997:i:2:p:635-54

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  1. Willem Thorbecke & Lee Coppock, 1995. "Monetary Policy, Stock Returns, and the Role of Credit in the Transmission of Monetary Policy," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_133, Levy Economics Institute.
  2. Campbell, J.Y. & Ammer, J., 1991. "What Moves The Stock And Bond Markets? A Variance Decomposition For Long- Term Asset Returns," Papers 127, Princeton, Department of Economics - Financial Research Center.
  3. Campbell, John Y & Mei, Jianping, 1993. "Where Do Betas Come From? Asset Price Dynamics and the," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 567-92.
  4. Stulz, Rene M, 1986. " Asset Pricing and Expected Inflation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(1), pages 209-23, March.
  5. Sims, Christopher A., 1992. "Interpreting the macroeconomic time series facts : The effects of monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 975-1000, June.
  6. Boschen, John F & Mills, Leonard O, 1995. "The Relation between Narrative and Money Market Indicators of Monetary Policy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(1), pages 24-44, January.
  7. Thorbecke, Willem & Alami, Tarik, 1994. "The effect of changes in the federal funds rate target on stock prices in the 1970s," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 13-19, February.
  8. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles Evans, 1994. "The effects of monetary policy shocks: evidence from the flow of funds," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Apr.
  9. James Tobin, 1977. "Monetary Policies and the Economy -- The Transmission Mechanism," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 456, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  10. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-21, September.
  11. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles Evans, 1994. "The Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks: Some Evidence from the Flow of Funds," NBER Working Papers 4699, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Chen, Nai-Fu & Roll, Richard & Ross, Stephen A, 1986. "Economic Forces and the Stock Market," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(3), pages 383-403, July.
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