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Intellectual Property Rights, the Industrial Revolution, and the Beginnings of Modern Economic Growth

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  • Joel Mokyr
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.99.2.349
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 99 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 349-55

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:349-55

    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.349
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    1. Allen, Robert C., 1983. "Collective invention," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, March.
    2. Nuvolari, A., 2001. "Collective Invention during the British Industrial Revolution: The Case of the Cornish Pumping Engine," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 01.04, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).
    3. Petra Moser, 2007. "Why Don't Inventors Patent?," NBER Working Papers 13294, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. William D. Nordhaus, 2004. "Schumpeterian Profits in the American Economy: Theory and Measurement," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1457, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    5. Jonathan Parker & Markus K Brunnermeier, 2002. "Optimal Expectations," FMG Discussion Papers dp434, Financial Markets Group.
    6. Sullivan, Richard J., 1989. "England's Age of invention: The acceleration of patents and patentable invention during the industrial revolution," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 424-452, October.
    7. Petra Moser, 2005. "How Do Patent Laws Influence Innovation? Evidence from Nineteenth-Century World's Fairs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1214-1236, September.
    8. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2002. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 9305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521684156 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. North, Douglass C. & Weingast, Barry R., 1989. "Constitutions and Commitment: The Evolution of Institutions Governing Public Choice in Seventeenth-Century England," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(04), pages 803-832, December.
    11. Christine MacLeod & Alessandro Nuvolari, 2006. "Inventive Activities, Patents and Early Industrialization. A Synthesis of Research Issues," DRUID Working Papers 06-28, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
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    Cited by:
    1. Olavarrieta, Sergio & Villena, Mauricio G., 2014. "Innovation and business research in Latin America: An overview," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 489-497.
    2. Deirdre McCloskey, 2013. "A neo-institutionalism of measurement, without measurement: A comment on Douglas Allen’s The Institutional Revolution," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 363-373, December.
    3. Erkan Gürpinar, 2013. "Organizational Forms in the Knowledge Economy: A Comparative Institutional Analysis," Department of Economics University of Siena 679, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

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