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Urbanization, Mortality, and Fertility in Malthusian England

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  • Gregory Clark
  • Neil Cummins

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.99.2.242
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 99 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 242-47

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:242-47

Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.242
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  1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, . "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," University of Chicago - Population Research Center, Chicago - Population Research Center 90-5a, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  2. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2000. "Natural Selection and the Origin of economic Growth," Working Papers 2000-18, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  3. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Mark Dincecco & Massimiliano Gaetano Onorato, 2013. "Military Conflict and the Rise of Urban Europe," Working Papers 7/2013, IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, revised Sep 2014.
  2. Marco Breschi & Massimo Esposito & Stanislao Mazzoni & Lucia Pozzi, 2014. "Fertility transition and social stratification in the town of Alghero, Sardinia (1866-1935)," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(28), pages 823-852, March.
  3. Nico Voigtländer & Joachim Voth, 2008. "The three horsemen of riches: Plague, war and urbanization in early modern Europe," Economics Working Papers 1115, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2012.
  4. Tommy Bengtsson & Martin Dribe, 2014. "The historical fertility transition at the micro level," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(17), pages 493-534, February.
  5. Voigtländer, Nico & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2009. "The Three Horsemen of Growth: Plague, War and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 7275, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Martin Dribe & Francesco Scalone, 2014. "Social class and net fertility before, during, and after the demographic transition: A micro-level analysis of Sweden 1880-1970," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(15), pages 429-464, February.
  7. Gregory Clark & Neil Cummins, 2010. "Malthus to Modernity: England’s First Fertility Transition, 1760-1800," Working Papers, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics 1013, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  8. Martin Dribe & Michel Oris & Lucia Pozzi, 2014. "Socioeconomic status and fertility before, during, and after the demographic transition: An introduction," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(7), pages 161-182, July.
  9. Jason Collins & Boris Baer & Ernst Juerg Weber, 2011. "Economic Growth And Evolution: Parental Preference For Quality And Quantity Of Offspring," Economics Discussion / Working Papers, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics 11-05, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.

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