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Pension Wealth of Government and Private Sector Workers

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  • Quinn, Joseph F

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 72 (1982)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 283-87

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:72:y:1982:i:2:p:283-87

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Cited by:
  1. Ugo Panizza, 1999. "Why Do Lazy People Make More Money? The Strange Case of the Public Sector Wage Premium," Research Department Publications 4176, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  2. Johnson, Richard W., 1997. "Pension Underfunding and Liberal Retirement Benefits Among State and Local Government Workers," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 50(1), pages 113-42, March.
  3. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter J., 2012. "Total Reward and pensions in the UK in the public and private sectors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 584-594.
  4. Philipp Bewerunge & Harvey S. Rosen, 2013. "Wages, Pensions, and Public-Private Sector Compensation Differentials for Older Workers," NBER Working Papers 19454, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Herman B. Leonard, 1984. "The Federal Civil Service Retirement System: An Analysis of its Financial Condition and Current Reform Proposals," NBER Working Papers 1258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Chatterjee, Swarn & Zahirovic-Herbert, Velma, 2009. "Retirement Plan Participation in the United States: Do Public Sector Employees Save More?," MPRA Paper 13546, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter, 2011. "Total Reward in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 5656, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Kathleen McGarry & Andrew Davenport, 1997. "Pensions and the Distribution of Wealth," NBER Working Papers 6171, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Ugo Panizza, 1999. "¿Por qué la gente floja gana más dinero? El extraño caso de la prima salarial del sector público," Research Department Publications 4177, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  10. Philipp Bewerunge & Harvey S. Rosen, 2012. "Wages, Pensions, and Public-Private Sector Compensation Differentials," Working Papers 1388, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  11. Gregory, Robert G. & Borland, Jeff, 1999. "Recent developments in public sector labor markets," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 53, pages 3573-3630 Elsevier.

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