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La productividad en la industria española: Evidencia microeconómica


  • Elena Huergo

    (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

  • Lourdes Moreno

    (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)


El objetivo de este trabajo es ofrecer una revisión de las principales regularidades que, desde una óptica microeconómica, se han observado en los trabajos que analizan la evolución de la productividad y los determinantes de su crecimiento en la economía española durante las últimas décadas. Los estudios señalan hacia la existencia de costes de ajuste y los procesos de entradas y salidas de empresas en los mercados como los principales causantes del carácter procíclico de la productividad en la industria manufacturera. Simultáneamente, la evidencia obtenida destaca la realización de actividades de I+D+I, la introducción de nuevas tecnologías de la información y las telecomunicaciones y la presión competitiva como los determinantes fundamentales, aunque no únicos, de su crecimiento.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Huergo & Lourdes Moreno, 2005. "La productividad en la industria española: Evidencia microeconómica," Industrial Organization 0504001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpio:0504001
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 41. DT. 05001. UCM. Facultad de CC. Económicas y Empresariales

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Growth; productivity; technological activities; firms' dynamics.;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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