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ICT Use and Productivity: A Synthesis from Studies of Australian Firms

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  • Productivity Commission

Abstract

The increased use of information and communications technology (ICT) has helped to raise Australia’s productivity growth, according to a new Commission study. It has enabled firms to innovate in what they do and how they do it. ICT Use and Productivity: A Synthesis from Studies of Australian Firms concludes that the stronger growth in the use of ICT in the second half of the 1990s added up to 1/2 a percentage point in the acceleration in annual labour productivity growth, principally as firms used additional ICT in place of additional labour.

Suggested Citation

  • Productivity Commission, 2004. "ICT Use and Productivity: A Synthesis from Studies of Australian Firms," Development and Comp Systems 0410005, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0410005 Note: Type of Document - pdf
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0410/0410005.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thierry Tressel, 2008. "Does Technological Diffusion Explain Australia’s Productivity Performance?," IMF Working Papers 08/4, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Centre for the Study of Living Standards, 2005. "What Explains the Canada-US ICT Investment Intensity Gap?," CSLS Research Reports 2005-06, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ABS; Australian Bureau of Statistics; Business; DITR Department of Industry; Tourism and Resources; ICTs; Information and Communication Technologies; OECD; Productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • P - Economic Systems

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