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Air Pollution in Siberia. A Volume and Risk-Weighted Analysis of a Siberian Pollution Database

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  • N.K. Warner-Merl

Abstract

Air pollution from industrial centers in Siberia pose observable environmental threats. Siberian ecosystems have begun to show stress from the accumulation of pollution depositions that come from cities and industrial plants. While some uncertainty exists as to the long-term effects of air pollution upon forests, in measurable terms such as human mortality and incidence of disease, forest species decline or forest dieback, observable impacts indicate that there is a cause for concern. Industrial emissions from large production centers regularly release toxins into the air, pollutants that find their way into forest soils and water systems. The risk-ranked and volume based chemical profiles here provide insight into the possible threats posed to the environment in specific regions and by specific compounds. More dynamic models must come forward to account for accumulation of pollutants, environmental response, and effects upon biodiversity in these areas. This report analyses a pollution database provided by the Russian Federation for Siberia from the years 1992 and 1993. It reveals a pollution profile with acute spots of emission exposure and large areas of less-affected environments. The report uses two methods to analyze emission and to identify possible abatement strategies. The first simply identifies the volume of given pollutants in given administrative regions (oblast, kray, republic), in specific towns, and in specific industrial sectors. The second approach applies a risk-weighting factor to help identify those chemicals that, regardless of total volume emitted, have higher destructive potential than the majority of reported pollutants. This approach reveals that Siberian policy makers can take several cost-effective steps towards reducing emissions and environmental threat in the region, while helping to improve industrial performance and the international competitiveness of Siberian enterprise.

Suggested Citation

  • N.K. Warner-Merl, 1998. "Air Pollution in Siberia. A Volume and Risk-Weighted Analysis of a Siberian Pollution Database," Working Papers ir98059, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:iasawp:ir98059
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Scheffer, Theodore C. & Hedgcock, George G., 1955. "Injury to Northwestern Forest Trees By Sulfur Dioxide from Smelters," Technical Bulletins 156878, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. V. Kiseleva, 1996. "Environmental Stress to the Siberian Forests: An Overview," Working Papers wp96045, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    3. J.C. Zasada & A.G. Gordon & C.W. Slaughter & L.C. Duchesne, 1997. "Ecological Considerations for the Sustainable Management of the North American Boreal Forests," Working Papers ir97024, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
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