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The Role of Knowledge in Regional Development. Theoretical Considerations and the Case of the Austrian-Hungarian Border Region


  • Melinda Smahó

    (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Regional Studies, West-Hungarian Research Institute)


Economic growth and development theories have neglected the role of knowledge and space for a long time. However, it is widely accepted that knowledge has played a more and more important role in economic development, and – due to its spatial characteristics – also in regional development. The aim of this paper is to explore the role and some spatial characteristics of knowledge, as well as their impact on regional development, also in regard to border regions. After some theoretical considerations, the paper investigates some features and cross-border cooperations of knowledge holders in the Austrian-Hungarian border region.

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  • Melinda Smahó, 2010. "The Role of Knowledge in Regional Development. Theoretical Considerations and the Case of the Austrian-Hungarian Border Region," WIFO Working Papers 355, WIFO.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2010:i:355

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. John B. Taylor, 2009. "The Financial Crisis and the Policy Responses: An Empirical Analysis of What Went Wrong," NBER Working Papers 14631, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    knowledge; universities; cross-border cooperation; Austrian-Hungarian border region;

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