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The political economy of teacher management in decentralized Indonesia

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  • Rosser,Andrew
  • Fahmi,Mohamad

Abstract

Indonesia faces serious challenges in the number, cost, quality, and distribution of teachers. This paper examines the role of political economy factors in producing these challenges and shaping efforts to resolve them. It argues that the challenges have their origins in the way in which political and bureaucratic elites have for decades used the school system to accumulate resources, distribute patronage, mobilize political support, and exercise political control. This orientation has meant that teacher numbers, quality, and distribution have been managed to maximize flows of rents and votes from schools to the elite, lubricate patronage and political networks, and ensure that elites maintain political control rather than maximize educational performance and equity. The fall of the New Order, the authoritarian and centralized regime that ruled Indonesia from 1965 to 1998, led to efforts to change this situation, but these have had little impact so far. The paper concludes by assessing what can be done by proponents of teacher management reform in this context to promote better outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosser,Andrew & Fahmi,Mohamad, 2016. "The political economy of teacher management in decentralized Indonesia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7913, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7913
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. World Bank, 2013. "Spending More or Spending Better : Improving Education Financing in Indonesia, Extended Executive Summary," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13207, The World Bank.
    2. Mae Chu Chang & Sheldon Shaeffer & Samer Al-Samarrai & Andrew B. Ragatz & Joppe de Ree & Ritchie Stevenson, 2014. "Teacher Reform in Indonesia : The Role of Politics and Evidence in Policy Making," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16355, April.
    3. Prawiro, Radius, 1998. "Indonesia's Struggle for Economic Development: Pragmatism in Action," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9789835600531.
    4. Aidan Mulkeen, 2010. "Teachers in Anglophone Africa : Issues in Teacher Supply, Training, and Management," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13545, April.
    5. Geeta Kingdon & Mohd. Muzammil, 2009. "A Political Economy of Education in India: The Case of Uttar Pradesh," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 123-144.
    6. World Bank, 2013. "Indonesia - Spending More or Spending Better : Improving Education Financing in Indonesia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13210, The World Bank.
    7. Andrew Rosser & Anuradha Joshi, 2013. "From User Fees to Fee Free: The Politics of Realising Universal Free Basic Education in Indonesia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 175-189, February.
    8. Edward Aspinall & Marcus Mietzner, 2014. "Indonesian Politics in 2014: Democracy's Close Call," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(3), pages 347-369, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Effective Schools and Teachers; Social Analysis; Government Policies; Regional Governance; Local Government; Educational Institutions&Facilities; Youth and Governance; Social Accountability; Quality of Life&Leisure; National Governance;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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