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Credit constraints and the north-south transmission of crises


  • Nguyen, Ha


Adverse shocks to rich countries often have a large and persistent negative impact on investment and output in developing countries. This paper examines a transmission mechanism that can account for this stylized fact. The mechanism is based on the existence of international financial frictions. Specifically, if a small, developing country has to collateralize its assets to borrow funds to invest, falling asset prices caused by a negative shock in an advanced economy worsen the developing country's collateral value and reduce its ability to borrow and reinvest. Hence, investment in the developing country declines, and international investors repatriate capital to the advanced country. As less capital now can be pledged as collateral, the developing country's credit constraint is further tightened, which leads to another round of decline in investment. This generates a downward spiral that may cause large output losses to the developing country. The mechanism finds empirical support in the 2008-2009 crisis data.

Suggested Citation

  • Nguyen, Ha, 2010. "Credit constraints and the north-south transmission of crises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5408, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5408

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Josep M Vilarrubia & Rubén Segura-Cayuela, 2008. "Uncertainty and entry into export markets," 2008 Meeting Papers 661, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Volker Nocke & Stephen Yeaple, 2006. "Globalization and Endogenous Firm Scope," NBER Working Papers 12322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Volpe Martincus, Christian & Carballo, Jerónimo, 2008. "Is export promotion effective in developing countries? Firm-level evidence on the intensive and the extensive margins of exports," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 89-106, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anton Korinek, 2011. "Hot Money and Serial Financial Crises," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(2), pages 306-339, June.

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    Debt Markets; Emerging Markets; Economic Theory&Research; Investment and Investment Climate; Country Strategy&Performance;

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