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Application of epsilon method to modeling expectations in construction


  • Natalia Nehrebecka

    () (Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw
    Department of Statistics, National Bank of Poland)

  • Sylwia Grudkowska

    (Department of Statistics, National Bank of Poland)


The epsilon method has been applied to examine the strength of relations among selected objective and subjective factors connected with a manager’s predictions of their companies’ development. The aim of this research was to study which variable has the strongest impact on business expectations in the construction industry. The results offer compelling evidence that respondents rely both on their current opinion on enterprise as well as on general economic situation. The survey was carried out based on Polish data from 2000:1 to 2008:10.

Suggested Citation

  • Natalia Nehrebecka & Sylwia Grudkowska, 2010. "Application of epsilon method to modeling expectations in construction," Working Papers 2010-01, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  • Handle: RePEc:war:wpaper:2010-01

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    epsilon method; multivariate statistical analysis; singular value decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing

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