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Corruption, Military Spending and Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Giorgio d'Agostino

    (Università degli Studi di Roma and UWE, Bristol)

  • Luca Pieroni

    () (University of Perugia and UWE, Bristol)

  • J Paul Dunne

    () (University of the West of England and University of Cape Town)

Abstract

This paper considers the complementary effect of corruption and military spending on economic growth, analyzing both the direct impact of public spending and effect of allocating resources between categories of public spending within the framework of an endogenous growth model. The non-linearities that emerge from are the result of the links between the components of public spending, corruption and economic growth. The main findings of the empirical analysis confirm the expectation that corruption and military burden lower the growth rate of GDP per capita. They also suggest that when the the complementarity effect between military spending and corruption is omitted, as in most studies, the impact of military burden on economic performance is underestimated.

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2011. "Corruption, Military Spending and Growth," Working Papers 1103, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:1103
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    File URL: http://carecon.org.uk/DPs/1103.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. How to kill growth: corruption and large military
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-04-21 19:43:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. d’Agostino, Giorgio & Dunne, J. Paul & Pieroni, Luca, 2016. "Government Spending, Corruption and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 190-205.
    2. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita, 2012. "Inclusive Institutions, Innovation and Economic Growth: Estimates for European Countries," MPRA Paper 43098, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Daddi, Pierluigi & Pieroni, Luca & Steinbrueck, Eric, 2014. "Does military spending stimulate growth? An empirical investigation in Italy," MPRA Paper 58290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2010. "Assessing the Effects of Military Expenditure on Growth," Working Papers 1012, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Goodness C. Aye & Mehmet Balcilar & John P. Dunne & Rangan Gupta & Reneé van Eyden, 2014. "Military expenditure, economic growth and structural instability: a case study of South Africa," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 619-633, December.
    6. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Dunne, John Paul & Pieroni, Luca, 2013. "Military Expenditure, Endogeneity and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 45640, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; military spending; development economics;

    JEL classification:

    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption

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