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An interdisciplinary research agenda for the study of ecological-economic systems in the American West


  • Amit Batabyal


Increased public awareness of resource management issues and new attitudes toward resource conservation have led to great interest in the subject of the apposite use and management of natural and environmental resources in the American west. This paper analyzes this subject from an interdisciplinary ecological-economic perspective. The paper first identifies and then discusses four salient issues concerning the study of the west’s ecological-economic systems that remain inadequately understood. Next, the paper proposes a research agenda that will enable us to shed light on some key questions concerning the functioning, health, and management of the west’s ecological-economic systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Amit Batabyal, "undated". "An interdisciplinary research agenda for the study of ecological-economic systems in the American West," Working Papers 2000-13, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:usu:wpaper:2000-13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Avinash Dixit & Peter Hammond & Michael Hoel, 1980. "On Hartwick's Rule for Regular Maximin Paths of Capital Accumulation and Resource Depletion," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(3), pages 551-556.
    2. Amitrajeet Batabyal & Basudeb Biswas & E. Godfrey, 2001. "On the Choice Between the Stocking Rate and Time in Range Management," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 20(3), pages 211-223, November.
    3. R. M. Solow, 1974. "Intergenerational Equity and Exhaustible Resources," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(5), pages 29-45.
    4. Hartwick, John M, 1977. "Intergenerational Equity and the Investing of Rents from Exhaustible Resources," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 972-974, December.
    5. Batabyal, Amitrajeet A. & Beladi, Hamid, 2004. "Time restrictions in natural resource management: A dynamic and stochastic analysis," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 157(3), pages 775-783, September.
    6. Batabyal, Amitrajeet A. & Biswas, Basudeb & Godfrey, E. Bruce, 2003. "A Dynamic And Stochastic Perspective On The Role Of Time In Range Management," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22149, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Amit Batabyal, "undated". "Contemporary research in ecological economics: five outstanding issues," Working Papers 2000-01, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    8. John M. Hartwick, 1978. "Substitution Among Exhaustible Resources and Intergenerational Equity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(2), pages 347-354.
    9. Batabyal, Amitrajeet A., 1999. "Aspects of the optimal management of cyclical ecological-economic systems," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 285-292, August.
    10. Dasgupta, Partha, 1996. "The economics of the environment," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(04), pages 387-428, October.
    11. Charles Perrings, 1998. "Resilience in the Dynamics of Economy-Environment Systems," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(3), pages 503-520, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Batabyal, Amitrajeet A., 2002. "Human actions, the survival of keystone species, and the resilience of ecological-economic systems," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3-4), pages 153-157.

    More about this item


    American West; ecological-economic system; interdisciplinary research agenda;

    JEL classification:

    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty

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