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Complementary approaches to the diffusion of ICT: empirical evidence on italian firm

Author

Listed:
  • Davide Arduini

    () (Dipartimento di Economia e Metodi Quantitativi, Università di Urbino (Italy))

  • Leopoldo Nascia

    () (National Bureau of Statistics, Italy)

  • Antonello Zanfei

    () (Dipartimento di Economia e Metodi Quantitativi, Università di Urbino (Italy))

Abstract

Using data on the adoption of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by 1947 Italian firms in 2004 and 2005, this paper provides evidence that is consistent with three largely complementary streams of literature on innovation diffusion. First, as suggested by epidemic models, we highlight the positive impact of early adopters’ performance on the rate of diffusion. Second, following probit models, we show how market structure and user characteristics, including their size and competencies, affect ICT adoption. Third and finally, we draw insights from systemic approaches to emphasise the dynamic role played by the public sector and by the technological and institutional context in which user firms are active.

Suggested Citation

  • Davide Arduini & Leopoldo Nascia & Antonello Zanfei, 2010. "Complementary approaches to the diffusion of ICT: empirical evidence on italian firm," Working Papers 1002, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Department of Economics, Society & Politics - Scientific Committee - L. Stefanini & G. Travaglini, revised 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:urb:wpaper:10_02
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    File URL: http://www.econ.uniurb.it/RePEc/urb/wpaper/WP_10_02.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Enrico Saltari & Giuseppe Travaglini, 2009. "The Productivity Slowdown Puzzle. Technological and Non-technological Shocks in the Labor Market," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 483-509.
    4. Jordi Gali, 1999. "Technology, Employment, and the Business Cycle: Do Technology Shocks Explain Aggregate Fluctuations?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 249-271.
    5. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Robert J. Vigfusson, 2003. "What happens after a technology shock?," International Finance Discussion Papers 768, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    7. Pizer, William A. & Popp, David, 2008. "Endogenizing technological change: Matching empirical evidence to modeling needs," Energy Economics, Elsevier, pages 2754-2770.
    8. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Robert J. Vigfusson, 2003. "What happens after a technology shock?," International Finance Discussion Papers 768, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    10. Pizer, William A. & Popp, David, 2008. "Endogenizing technological change: Matching empirical evidence to modeling needs," Energy Economics, Elsevier, pages 2754-2770.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cette, G. & Lopez, J., 2009. "ICT Demand Behaviour: an International Comparison," Working papers 252, Banque de France.
    2. Rovira, Sebastián & Santoleri, Pietro & Stumpo, Giovanni, 2013. "Incorporación de TIC en el sector productivo: uso y desuso de las políticas públicas para favorecer su difusión," Sede de la CEPAL en Santiago (Estudios e Investigaciones) 37255, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    3. Rovira, Sebastián & Santoleri, Pietro & Stumpo, Giovanni, 2013. "Incorporación de TIC en el sector productivo: uso y desuso de las políticas públicas para favorecer su difusión," Sede de la CEPAL en Santiago (Estudios e Investigaciones) 37255, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    4. Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez, 2012. "ICT demand behaviour: an international comparison," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 397-410.
    5. Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez, 2012. "ICT demand behaviour: an international comparison," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 397-410.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Innovation diffusion; Technology adoption; Truncated and Censored Models.;

    JEL classification:

    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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