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Age at Migration, Language and Fertility Patterns among Migrants to Canada

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  • Ferrer, Ana

Abstract

This paper explores the fertility patterns of immigrant children to Canada using the 20 percent sample of the Canadian Census from 1991 through 2006. Fertility increases with age at immigration, with a sharp rise for those immigrating in their late teens and this pattern is similar for all countries of origin. Proficiency in official languages does not seem a key mechanism through which age at immigration affects fertility – fertility of immigrants with an official mother tongue also differs from that of natives. Formal education, however, matters as college graduates who arrived to Canada at any age before adulthood show similar fertility patterns as their native peers, whereas fertility of those who did not reach tertiary education rises with age at migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Ferrer, Ana, 2012. "Age at Migration, Language and Fertility Patterns among Migrants to Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2012-2, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 29 Jan 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:ubc:clssrn:clsrn_admin-2012-2
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    File URL: http://www.clsrn.econ.ubc.ca/workingpapers/CLSRN%20Working%20Paper%20no.%2091%20-%20Ana%20Ferrer.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2003. "Language proficiency and labour market performance of immigrants in the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(489), pages 695-717, July.
    2. Timothy Guinnane & Carolyn Moehling & Cormac O Grada, 2002. "The Fertility of the Irish in America in 1910," Working Papers 848, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stichnoth, Holger & Yeter, Mustafa, 2013. "Cultural influences on the fertility behaviour of first- and second-generation immigrants in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-023, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Lotta Persson & Jan M. Hoem, 2014. "Immigrant fertility in Sweden, 2000-2011: A descriptive note," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(30), pages 887-898, March.
    3. Ciro Avitabile & Irma Clots-Figueras & Paolo Masella, 2014. "Citizenship, Fertility, and Parental Investments," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 35-65, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Migration; Age at Migration; Language;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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