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Does persistence of social exclusion exist in Spain?

  • Ambra Poggi


    (Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)

The aim of this paper is to analyze the causes leading to social exclusion dynamics. In particular, we wish to understand why any individual experiencing social exclusion today is much more likely to experience it again. In fact, there are two distinct processes that may generate a persistence of social exclusion: heterogeneity (individuals are heterogeneous with respect to some observed and/or unobserved adverse characteristics that are relevant for the chance of experiencing social exclusion and persistence over time) and true state of dependence (experiencing social exclusion in a specific time period, in itself, increases the probability of undergoing social exclusion in subsequent periods). Distinguishing between the two processes is crucial since the policy implications are very different.

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Paper provided by Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona in its series Working Papers with number wpdea0308.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uab:wprdea:wpdea0308
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