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Industrial Restructuring and Innovation Policy in Central and Eastern Europe since 1990

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  • Erik S. Reinert
  • Rainer Kattel
  • Margit Suurna

Abstract

The paper aims to show that, first, innovation policies deployed in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries since 1990s have been a double-edged sword: on the one hand enabling fast and furious industrial restructuring while, on the other hand, locking CEE economies into economic activities with low value added/productivity growth and thus undermining future sustainable growth. However, the impact of accession into the European Union (EU) has been equally pivotal for industrial restructuring and innovation policy making in CEE countries in the 2000s and this process can be summed up as a strong Europeanization of innovation policy in CEE. The paper proceeds to show, second, that also Europeanization has been largely a double-edged sword for CEE countries. Since joining the EU in 2004 or 2007, and already during the accession process, there is a strong change in innovation policies in many CEE countries towards a much more active role of the state. In this change there is a clear and strong role of EUÿs structural funding, particularly the negotiations and planning that comes with it. However, these changes come with specific problems: first, there is an over-emphasis in emerging CEE innovation policies on a linear understanding of innovation (from lab to market) that is based on the assumption that there is a growing demand from industry for R&D (which is not the case because of the structural changes that took place in the 1990s via the Washington Consensus policies); and, second, increasing usage of independent implementation agencies in an already weak administrative capacity environment lacking policy skills for networking and long-term planning.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik S. Reinert & Rainer Kattel & Margit Suurna, 2009. "Industrial Restructuring and Innovation Policy in Central and Eastern Europe since 1990," The Other Canon Foundation and Tallinn University of Technology Working Papers in Technology Governance and Economic Dynamics 23, TUT Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance.
  • Handle: RePEc:tth:wpaper:23
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    Cited by:

    1. Hölscher, Jens & Nulsch, Nicole & Stephan, Johannes, 2010. "State Aid in the Enlarged European Union. An Overview," IWH Discussion Papers 24/2010, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    2. Emilia Balan, 2014. "Privatization of Industry in Central and Eastern European Countries," Revista de Economie Mondiala / The Journal of Global Economics, Institute for World Economy, Romanian Academy, vol. 6(2), June.
    3. Michael Wyrwich, 2014. "Ready, set, go! Why are some regions entrepreneurial jump starters?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(2), pages 487-513, September.
    4. Vadim V. Krivorotov & Alexey V. Kalina & Zhanna S. Belyaeva & Sergey Ye Erypalov, 2016. "Optimisation model for industrial complex competitiveness: a path to sustainable innovation process," World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 12(2/3), pages 254-269.
    5. Rainer Kattel & Erkki Karo, 2010. "Is 'Open Innovation' Re-Inventing Innovation Policy for Catching-up Economies?," The Other Canon Foundation and Tallinn University of Technology Working Papers in Technology Governance and Economic Dynamics 30, TUT Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance.
    6. Erkki Karo & Rainer Kattel, 2009. "The Copying Paradox: Why Converging Policies but Diverging Capacities for Development in Eastern European Innovation Systems?," The Other Canon Foundation and Tallinn University of Technology Working Papers in Technology Governance and Economic Dynamics 24, TUT Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance.

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