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Money In A Model With Overlapping Production Activities


  • Miquel Faig


This paper advances a model which can account for these five prominent facts of monetary economics. (i) Money is held in non trivial amounts even though it is a dominated asset. (ii) High rates of inflation lead to low rates of growth. (iii) Monetary injections momentarily depress the rate of interest. (iv) Hyper-inflations can be ended with a minimal loss of output. (v) Liquidity crises lead to recessions. The model advanced develops the second variation in Woodford (1990). The model is designed to capture three features of reality, which form the basis for modeling money as a dominated asset: Income and expenditures by households and firms are not synchronized. Money is used to transfer income from the time it is received to the time it is spent because real assets are costly to liquidate, and capital markets are imperfect. And money improves the allocation of resources by providing flexibility to the timing of consumption and investment. In this model, monetary shocks affect total factor productivity. Hence, the model offers a link between the real business cycle model and a monetary approach to the business cycle.

Suggested Citation

  • Miquel Faig, 1998. "Money In A Model With Overlapping Production Activities," Working Papers faig-98-03, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:faig-98-03

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Steven Craig & Robert P. Inman, 1986. "Education, Welfare and the "New" Federalism: State Budgeting in a Federalist Public Economy," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in State and Local Public Finance, pages 187-228 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    3. Sam Peltzman, 1992. "Voters as Fiscal Conservatives," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 327-361.
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    6. Edward M. Gramlich & Deborah S. Laren, 1984. "Migration and Income Redistribution Responsibilities," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(4), pages 489-511.
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    More about this item


    Money; long lived projects;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • O42 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Monetary Growth Models


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