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"Voice" and "Exit" in Japanese Firms during the Second World War: Sanpo Revisited

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  • Tetsuji Okazaki

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo)

Abstract

During the Second World War, the Japanese government and private sector searched for and implemented new mechanisms for coordination and new incentives. One of these was sangyo hokokukai or sanpo. Sanpo unit was essentially an organization of the employer and employees of each firm, which held employees meetings to moderate labor relations. In this paper, I examined the role of sanpo, using prefectural data and firm level data, based on a framework integrating the "voice view" of unionism and the transaction cost economics. According to the analysis of prefectural data, sanpo reduced the level of participation in labor disputes until around 1941, and enhanced labor productivity until 1942. Estimating production function by monthly firm level data from the cotton spinning industry, we found that sanpo increased TFP by 3.1%. Also, from the annual establishment level data from the coal mining industry, we can confirm that sanpo enhanced labor productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Tetsuji Okazaki, 2003. ""Voice" and "Exit" in Japanese Firms during the Second World War: Sanpo Revisited," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-243, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2003cf243
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brown, Charles & Medoff, James, 1978. "Trade Unions in the Production Process," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(3), pages 355-378, June.
    2. Nicholas Wilson & Michael J. Peel, 1991. "The Impact on Absenteeism and Quits of Profit-Sharing and other Forms of Employee Participation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(3), pages 454-468, April.
    3. Tracy, Joseph S, 1986. "An Investigation into the Determinants of U.S. Strike Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 423-436, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2008. "Tenant, Landlord, and Risk: Revisiting the Debate on Japanese Capitalism," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f144, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 27 Aug 2019.

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