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On Factors explaining Organisational Innovation and its Effects

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  • Koson Sapprasert

    (Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo)

Abstract

This paper demonstrates how various factors influence the probability of attempts at organisational innovation and the effects of such innovation. An integrated firm-level dataset obtained from two recent waves of the Norwegian Community Innovation Survey (CIS3 & 4) and firms’ financial accounts is used to investigate these factors. An analysis which employed a Heckman two-step estimation to ensure against potential sample selection bias demonstrates that, between 1999 and 2004, Norwegian firms were persistent in organisational innovation, and this persistence raised the (positive) effects of organisational innovation on their performance. In addition, the results indicate that a firm’s decision to pursue organisational innovation can be influenced by its past economic performance and the high costs of innovation. The results also reveal that a good share of firms in the sample undertook, and benefitted from, different types of organisational change, and such benefits could increase by means of the complementarity of organisational and technological innovation. In further explaining the rates and consequences of organisational innovation, this study argues that a firm’s age and size have different impacts on its decision to undertake organisational innovation and on the effects of such innovation on its performance. The study found some evidence to suggest that older, larger firms are more inclined to make an attempt at organisational change, while, in terms of outcomes, smaller firms are more able to benefit from such an attempt.

Suggested Citation

  • Koson Sapprasert, 2008. "On Factors explaining Organisational Innovation and its Effects," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20080601, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo, revised Apr 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:tik:inowpp:20080601 Note: Earlier version was presented at the DRUID summer conference 2008
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    File URL: http://www.tik.uio.no/InnoWP/Organizational%20Innovation%20Koson%20Sapprasert.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Organisational Innovation; Firm Performance; Complementarity; Persistency; Age & Size;

    JEL classification:

    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • O39 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Other

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