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Do Employers Support Immigration?


  • Yuji Tamura

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)


This paper examines whether or not being an employer was an important determinant of individual preferences for immigration restriction in the EU member states in the eve of the 2004 enlargement. Our results do not confirm that employers were more pro-immigration than the rest by expecting a reduction in the cost of labor except in the following sector: sanitation-related activities such as refuse disposal and recreational, cultural and sports activities. On the contrary, we find that employers were more likely to be anti-immigration than the rest in sectors where foreign workers were highly present, such as household activities, construction, wholesale, hotels and restaurants.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuji Tamura, 2007. "Do Employers Support Immigration?," Trinity Economics Papers tep1107, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep1107

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Van Biesebroeck, Johannes, 2008. "The Sensitivity of Productivity Estimates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 26, pages 311-328.
    2. Johannes Sauer & Klaus Frohberg & Henrich Hockmann, 2006. "Stochastic efficiency measurement: The curse of theoretical consistency," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 9, pages 139-166, May.
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    More about this item


    individual attitudes toward immigration; employer; EU;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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