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Reserve Options Mechanism and FX Volatility

Author

Listed:
  • Arif Oduncu
  • Yasin Akcelik
  • Ergun Ermisoglu

Abstract

Reserve Options Mechanism (ROM), which is the option to hold FX or gold reserves in increasing tranches in place of Turkish Lira reserve requirements of Turkish banks, was designed and launched by the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey (CBRT). ROM is a tool unique to the CBRT and it is aimed to support the FX reserve management of the banking system and to limit the adverse effects of excess capital flow volatility on the macroeconomic and financial stability of Turkey. In this paper, we study the effectiveness of ROM on the volatility of Turkish Lira, and to the best of our knowledge, it is the first analytical paper on investigating the effects of the ROM. The results suggest that ROM is an effective policy tool in decreasing the volatility of Turkish lira in the sample period.

Suggested Citation

  • Arif Oduncu & Yasin Akcelik & Ergun Ermisoglu, 2013. "Reserve Options Mechanism and FX Volatility," Working Papers 1303, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcb:wpaper:1303
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    File URL: http://www.tcmb.gov.tr/wps/wcm/connect/EN/TCMB+EN/Main+Menu/Publications/Research/Working+Paperss/2013/13-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hakan Kara, 2016. "A brief assessment of Turkey's macroprudential policy approach : 2011–2015," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 16(3), pages 85-92.
    2. Değerli, Ahmet & Fendoğlu, Salih, 2015. "Reserve option mechanism as a stabilizing policy tool: Evidence from exchange rate expectations," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 166-179.
    3. repec:eee:reveco:v:51:y:2017:i:c:p:405-416 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Yeldan A. Erinc & Kolsuz Gunes & Unuvar Burcu, 2014. "What to Smooth: Rate of Interest or the Foreign Exchange? Turkish Monetary Policy under Turbulent Times," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-15, December.
    5. Ahmet Aysan & Salih Fendoglu & Mustafa Kilinc, 2014. "Managing short-term capital flows in new central banking: unconventional monetary policy framework in Turkey," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 4(1), pages 45-69, June.
    6. repec:spr:pharme:v:4:y:2014:i:1:p:45-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:blg:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:2:p:35-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Yasin Akçelik & Ahmet Faruk Aysan & Arif Oduncu, 2013. "Central Banking in Making during the Post-Crisis World and the Policy-Mix of the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey," Journal of Central Banking Theory and Practice, Central bank of Montenegro, vol. 2(2), pages 5-18.
    9. Aytug, Huseyin, 2016. "Does the Reserve Options Mechanism really decrease exchange rate volatility? The Synthetic Control Method Approach," MPRA Paper 71400, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Oduncu, Arif & Ermişoğlu, Ergun & Polat, Tandogan, 2013. "Credit Growth Volatility," MPRA Paper 49058, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Akturk, Halit & Gocen, Hasan & Duran, Suleyman, 2015. "Money Multiplier under Reserve Option Mechanism," MPRA Paper 64803, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Reserve Options Mechanism; Volatility of Turkish Lira; Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey’s Policy Mix; GARCH;

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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