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How does private foreign borrowing affect the risk of sovereign default in developing countries?




We argue that increased foreign borrowing by the private sector reduces the risk that a developing country's government defaults on its foreign debt. We present a simple model in which private foreign borrowing reflects a surge of private entrepreneurship. A larger "entrepreneurial class" raises the political costs of default and reduces the government's incentive to deny repayment. The results of our empirical analysis support the model's key hypothesis.

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  • Oya Celasun & Philipp Harms, 2007. "How does private foreign borrowing affect the risk of sovereign default in developing countries?," Working Papers 07.04, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
  • Handle: RePEc:szg:worpap:0704

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Smith, Bruce D., 1984. "Private information, deposit interest rates, and the `stability' of the banking system," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 293-317, November.
    2. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    3. Chang, Roberto & Velasco, Andres, 2000. "Financial Fragility and the Exchange Rate Regime," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 1-34, May.
    4. Barry Eichengreen & Andrew K. Rose, 1998. "Staying Afloat When the Wind Shifts: External Factors and Emerging-Market Banking Crises," NBER Working Papers 6370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hallak, Issam, 2013. "Private sector share of external debt and financial stability: Evidence from bank loans," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 17-41.
    2. Christoph Trebesch & Michael G. Papaioannou & Udaibir S Das, 2012. "Sovereign Debt Restructurings 1950-2010; Literature Survey, Data, and Stylized Facts," IMF Working Papers 12/203, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Christoph Trebesch, 2009. "The Cost of Aggressive Sovereign Debt Policies; How Much is theprivate Sector Affected?," IMF Working Papers 09/29, International Monetary Fund.

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