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Market masculinities and electronic trading

Author

Listed:
  • Matthias Klaes

    (Centre for Economic Research, Keele University, England)

  • Geoff Lightfoot

    (Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy, University of Leicester, England)

  • Simon Lilley

    (Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy, University of Leicester, England)

Abstract

The transition from exchange mediated by the technology of open outcry to that mediated more entirely by screen might be expected to alter the pronounced gendering of trading. Focusing on narrative repertoires of alternative trading regimes we examine how traders make sense of their activities at the same time as practically orienting them and argue that compared to the widely acknowledged masculinity of open outcry trading, screen based trading provides no less of an arena for expression of compulsory masculinity. Methodologically, we call for greater attention to ethnographically grounded analyses of the gendered repertoires of exchange.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Klaes & Geoff Lightfoot & Simon Lilley, 2007. "Market masculinities and electronic trading," SCEME Working Papers: Advances in Economic Methodology 014/2007, SCEME.
  • Handle: RePEc:sti:wpaper:014/2007
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sceme.org.uk/wps/SCEME014_KlaesLilleyLightfoot_2007.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Herrmann-Pillath Carsten, 2014. "Naturalizing Institutions: Evolutionary Principles and Application on the Case of Money," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(2-3), pages 388-421, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    behavioral-finance; feminist-economics; gender; narrative;

    JEL classification:

    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • B54 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Feminist Economics
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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