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One asset, two prices: the case of the Tsarist repudiated bonds


  • Kim Oosterlinck
  • Ariane Szafarz


Prices of repudiated bonds are insightful but scarcely observed. Based on an original daily database, this paper compares the price evolution from January 6, 1916 to August 31, 1919 of a cross-listed (Paris and London) Tsarist bond repudiated by the Soviets on February 8, 1918. After its repudiation, the bond exhibits an important geographic price differential. This phenomenon is attributed to the conjunction of war conditions excluding arbitrage and specific investors' expectations regarding bailouts by the French and British governments. Furthermore, data from the pre-repudiation period show that the impossibility for arbitrage is not sufficient for driving the pricing differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim Oosterlinck & Ariane Szafarz, 2004. "One asset, two prices: the case of the Tsarist repudiated bonds," Working Papers CEB 04-022.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:sol:wpaper:04-022

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Eaton, Jonathan & Fernandez, Raquel, 1995. "Sovereign debt," Handbook of International Economics,in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 3, pages 2031-2077 Elsevier.
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    3. Wells, John & Wills, Dougals, 2000. "Revolution, Restoration, and Debt Repudiation: The Jacobite Threat to England's Institutions and Economic Growth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(02), pages 418-441, June.
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    5. Claessens, Stijn & Pennacchi, George, 1996. "Estimating the Likelihood of Mexican Default from the Market Prices of Brady Bonds," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(01), pages 109-126, March.
    6. Oosterlinck, Kim, 2003. "The bond market and the legitimacy of Vichy France," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 326-344, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kim Oosterlinck & John Landon-lane, 2006. "Hope Springs Eternal – French Bondholders and the Soviet Repudiation (1915–1919)," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 10(4), pages 507-535, December.
    2. Waldenström, Daniel, 2005. "Does Sovereign Risk Differ for Domestic and Foreign Investors? Historical Evidence from Scandinavian Bond Markets," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 585, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 18 Feb 2005.
    3. John Landon-Lane & Kim Oosterlinck, 2005. "Hope springs eternal… French bondholders and the Soviet Repudiation (1915-1919)," Departmental Working Papers 200513, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    Bonds; repudiation; sovereign debt; Russia.;

    JEL classification:

    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • N24 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: 1913-

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